Thursday, July 2, 2009

Jacob Bachman 1830 - 1907


Jacob Bachman was born 1830 in Wiliberg, Switzerland. He married Elisabeth Sutter (? sp) in 1852. Two years later, Mormon missionaries came to the neighborhood and Jacob, his wife, and his brother’s family joined the church.

Persecution caused the spirit of emigration to seize upon the brothers and it was decided that Jacob would come to Utah first. If he found conditions satisfactory, his brother would follow him. At the time the brothers owned the Switzerland homestead jointly. Jacob’s brother purchased Jacob’s interest for $2,000, 10,000 francs in Swiss money, a considerable fortune. One thousand dollars was considered an ample sum to take the family to Utah and to purchase a home. This sum was entrusted to two Mormon Elders for safe-keeping, but they got into some difficulty with the authorities and it cost them the entire sum to free themselves. This delayed Jacob for sometime, but he was determined to go to Zion, and after some months his brother was able to give him the remaining one thousand dollars.

The trip across the ocean in a sailboat took six weeks, and the family was crowded into the poorest part of the boat. Jacob called it a cattle ship. The trip across the plains in a covered wagon drawn by ox teams was a hard one, especially for Elisabeth, who gave birth to her sixth child, Sarah, while crossing the plains. The baby died soon after her birth. Finally they arrived in Utah in 1863. His brother never left Wiliberg and none of his family are known to be members of the LDS church. Jacob farmed in Eden, Utah and died in 1907 at 77.

Full history of Jacob Bachman.

Full history of Elizabeth Suter, (note: Emma spells it Suter, the grave marker says Sutter).

2015 visit to Wiliberg

German Text on Jacob's family

Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol. 4, p. 273

"History as given by son, Emuel Bachman. Near the head of a little valley, which is about 6 or 8 miles long and varying in width from about a half a mile to a mile at its widest place, in the foot-hill regions of the Switzerland Alps, is a hill named Willsberg. It is about 600 feet above the base of the little valley. About half way up the hill, overlooking a beautiful small creek, is a typical Swiss house, nestled in the center of a growth of old and stately hazelnut trees. This house is the ancestral home of the Bachman family. How long the family has lived there is not known. Presumably it has lived there many generations and perhaps the family name of Bachman was taken from the residence there itself, meaning "The man of the creek, or Creek Man."

"My father, Jacob Bachman, son of Hans R. Bachman, was born here the 26th day of April 1830. He died in Ogden, Utah, December 19, 1907. My mother was Elizabeth Sutter, born in the city of Aarau, well-educated daughter of a lawyer, in whose office she served as his scrivener. They were married December 3, 1852, and joined the Church in the year 1855. They started for Utah in 1862. On arriving at Bern, Switzerland, I was born August 17 of that year. This made our family a family of 5 children leaving for Zion; Frana, Henry, Jacob, Elizabeth and Emuel (myself). Mary, the oldest of the children had died before the family started.

"Our first home in Utah was in Harrisville, in Mound Fort, Weber County. But we soon moved to Liberty in Ogden Valley. The extreme cold and want of food and clothing for his family caused my father to complain bitterly of his sacrifice of a good home and plenty in Switzerland. He became very ill, and during which time he saw the mistake of complaining, and repented. My mother, was always strong in the faith. From Liberty we moved to Eden, where, in November 1866 my mother died. In about a year my father married a widow by the name of Anna Stone who had one child. From this union there were born 4 children, making a total of 13."


Hi Steven

In German we differ between officials from towns (Stadtrat) and officials from villages (Gemeinderat). Wiliberg is a village. I’m not sure whether you are using the word mayor for all type of communities (village, town, city). Anyway we only serve Wiliberg.

A1: Attached you find a map of Wiliberg. The red circle marks the area where Angelika, Rene and I live. The blue circle marks the restaurant we met and the blue line is the walk we did to the Stettler house.

A2: For an American, besides the mountain area, I think Switzerland looks like one huge urban area. You hardly find a spot not seeing a house within distance. Wiliberg is a little different. And that’s what I like the most. Still in a 10 minute drive you are on the highway and it takes you less than an hour to reach major cities like Zurich, Berne, Luzern, Basel.

A3: The shop next to the restaurant is a locksmith. I explained it wrong. Of course you can order a banister for your house. But I  think in a building supply store you get almost everything to fix or build a house. 


The third business is active in marketing: Willkommen bei wolf-media.ch - new media marketing & events


We have one full-time farmer and plus minus 7 part-time farmers

A4: In official writing the restaurant is spelled Moosersäge.
Moos = moss
Säge = saw (on the other side of the creek is a sawmill)


I remember when I tried to explain Moos, Jack helped me using moor. Now I know the right term is moss. For areas in the base of a valley where a creek or river runs through we use the term Moos a lot because during heavy rain the land can get flooded and stays wet for a long time.

Hopefully you understood my explanations. Otherwise don’t hesitate to ask me to clarify it.



Regards
Patric



Wiliberg:

How far is it from Wiliberg to the major cities of Switzerland?

I think Switzerland looks like one huge urban area. You hardly find a spot not seeing a house within distance. Wiliberg is a little different. And that’s what I like the most. Still in a 10 minute drive you are on the highway and it takes you less than an hour to reach major cities like Zurich, Berne, Luzern, Basel. 


















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Our ancestral villages are Wiliberg where Jacob is from, Ottenbach where Anna is from, and Bözberg where Elizabetha was from.  Then there's Bottenwil--  the Bachmanns were legal citizens of Bottenwil, although we don't know when and if they ever lived there.  Forty-two years ago, I found Jacob's brother's family in Kölliken--  the Bachmanns there are now prosperous owners of a trucking company.   Then there's the church where Jacob and his family attended in Reitnau.   All of these villages are within an hour's drive from one another.  Some of them right next to each other. S

Wiliberg has an area, as of 2009, of 0.5 sq mi. Of this area, 0.3 sq mi or 72.6% is used for agricultural purposes, while 0.1 sq mi or 17.9% is forested. Of the rest of the land, 35 acres or 12.0% is settled (buildings or roads).

9/9/2015
If you catch up with Rene', would you mind asking just one of those other questions, "Where does he go to get historical and genealogical information re Wiliberg?   Church, government in Aarau?  Thanks

Regarding the house, maybe it boils down to 2 possibilities: 
1)  The name in the house is difficult to read and really says Bachman.  "ch" in old script looks like "uf".
2)  The house was built in the 1700's or earlier by a Baumann.  The Bachmanns, citizens of Bottenwil, purchased the land and house back then.

Steve

Patric, I can't tell you how much we appreciate this information.  It supplies some new insights into our family history:

1)  Our great-grandfather's legal name was probably Hans Jacob Bachmann-Suter (the Suter being his mother's surname).  I have a grandson named Hans, so now we can tell him that he has a family name :)  Interesting that Jacob is spelled the English way--  with a "c" instead of a "k".

2)  The house's record of sales, just from 1850, shows that it was sold many times.  I'm thinking that a 16th century Baumann owned the house at one time and probably built it.  It's surprising that subsequent owners left the name on the door lintel.  Maybe Baumann was a well-known name in the area's history and the owners were proud the name was there and preserved it.

3)  We knew that Jacob had sold his part of the house to his brother, but I assumed he had done it much later, to finance his immigration to America.  These records say that he sold it in 1853, just after he was married.  The family didn't sail to America until 1862.  So we don't know for sure where Jacob and Elizabetha lived for the 9 years, 1853-1862.  Baby Emuel was born to them in Bern in 1861 or 1862.

I think that Jacob and Elizabetha may have remained at the house and that their first children (my great-grandmother Verena) were born at the house, but now we can't be sure, since Jacob didn't own the house after his first year of marriage.

Our information has brother Johannes Rudolf paying Jacob the equivalent of $2000 in at least 2 installments.  Jacob lost the first $1000 sometime after 1854 and used the second $1000 to immigrate to America.

Maybe Jacob and Elizabetha were saving the first $1000 to buy their own place, but then, at some point, decided to use it to immigrate to America and establish a home there.  When they lost the first $1000, that delayed their departure until their brother could pay the second $1000.

I'd like to check the accuracy of a couple of addresses :)  Patric Jakob, Bergstrasse 95, 5058 Wiliberg, Switzerland.  Rene' Rindlisbacher, Buchacker 73, 5058 Wiliberg, Switzerland.  Don't worry, I'm just going to mail you two something :)

Thanks again,
Steve

Bachman home in 1955:

Hi Steven

Okay, I think you’re right. Here my answers with the best of my knowledge:

Bottenwil…
In Switzerland, the place of origin (German: Heimatort or Bürgerort, literally "home place" or "citizen place") denotes where the Swiss citizen has his municipal citizenship. It is not to be confused with the place of birth or the place of residence, although two or all three of these locations can be identical depending on the person. I copied these lines from Wikipedia. As an example when I was born, my parents lived in Schupfen. However, I got my fathers place of origin (Lauperswil). I never lived there. In Switzerland you not necessary have a connection to your place of origin. In the early days, when you needed help because of poverty, the town or village of your place of origin had to help you monetary by law. Today it is the place where you live currently.  These days once place of origin is used as an example, when you emigrate. Then some of the important papers (birth certificate, …) are kept there.
Sacherruedi…
First name: Rudolf (nickname,like you mentioned: Ruedi)
Last name: Bachmann
It is common, when a lot of people have the same name (first or last) you are using special nicknames to keep them apart. Because Rudolf Bachmann lived in the Sacher area of Wiliberg, people called him „Sacherruedi“, like you concluded by yourself.
Mähen…
Two of the Bachmanns cutting grass in the Sacher area. Who is who is unknown.
The houses im Sacher…
Yes, the hame „Baumann“ was engraved inside the house. So far I understand, the house was owned for some time by a family named Baumann. Mr. Stettler himself bought it from Baumann. Therefore the deed must be dated later.
Mr. Stettler was not born in the Bachmann house.
Swiss-German…
We only use the term Swiss-German in the context of language. As an example: I’m Swiss and mother tongue is Swiss German.
The church in Reitnau…

Protestants. You are right after 25 years the graves are removed. Relatives are asked to get the headstone. Don’t ask me what happens with the remains after this time, if the person did not get cremated. For sure the remains do not get re-buried.

I hope this information helps you to write it up. I know there are still some questions open. When I have a chance in the future, I will address them to René and come back to you.


Regards
Patric

9/14/15Hi Steven

The house:
The following information about the house are based on the building register for insurance companies. This registers were introduced in 1850.
- 1850: We don’t know, there is just this inscription reading „Baumann“ on the door lintel
1850: The house belonged to Hans Jacob Bachmann-Suter (1830 - 1907) and his brother Johannes Rudolf Bachmann-Müller (1828 - 1904)
1853: Hans Jacob Bachmann-Suter sells his part of the house to his brother Johannes
1867: Johannes Hadorn from Forst canton Berne (today Forst is a district of the town Berne) bought the house
1872: Johannes Rudolf Bachmann-Müller bought the house back
1904: The youngest son Jakob Bachmann-Blatter (1871 - 1929) inherits the house
1911: The neighbor Gottfried Suter-Jäggi bought the house
1914: Jakob Bachmann-Blatter bought it back
1923: Gottfried Stettler-Brechbühler (the father from Gottfried Stettler, now living in the house) bought it

The deed we saw was the sale from Jakob Bachmann to Gottfried Stettler dated 1923.


Family crest (coat-of-arms?) of Bachmann from Bottenwil was deposited with a notarial seal in the public record office of canton Aargau in 1855, what René believes:
The white divider running from top left to bottom right symbolizes the creek Uerke
The 3 green hills on the bottom symbolize the location of Bottenwil (between hills)
The stars symbolize nobility (the rulers like dikes or reeves) ruling over Bottenwil
The circle (René speaks of a globe) with the cross on top could symbolize a monastery (in the case of Bottenwil, the monastery Einsiedeln, the former owner / ruler of Bottenwil)


The document „1824-11-09 Taufzettel Bachmann Elisabeth" about the baptism:
Child to be baptized: Elisabeth Bachmann (born 11.09.1824 in Wiliberg, deceased 16.02.1874) sister of Hans Jacob Bachmann-Suter and Johannes Rudolf Bachmann-Müller

The document „1869-23-05 Taufzettel Bachmann Lina“ about the baptism:
Child to be baptized: Lina Bachmann (1869 - 1953) niece of the emigrant Hans Jacob Bachmann-Suter
Parents: Johannes Rudolf Bachmann-Müller
Godfather: Samuel Bachmann from Reitnau
Godmother: Susette Suter from Wiliberg


I asked René by mail who his sources are.


Regards
Patric
9/14/2015

Patric, I can't tell you how much we appreciate this information.  It supplies some new insights into our family history:

1)  Our great-grandfather's legal name was probably Hans Jacob Bachmann-Suter (the Suter being his mother's surname).  I have a grandson named Hans, so now we can tell him that he has a family name :)  Interesting that Jacob is spelled the English way--  with a "c" instead of a "k".

2)  The house's record of sales, just from 1850, shows that it was sold many times.  I'm thinking that a 16th century Baumann owned the house at one time and probably built it.  It's surprising that subsequent owners left the name on the door lintel.  Maybe Baumann was a well-known name in the area's history and the owners were proud the name was there and preserved it.

3)  We knew that Jacob had sold his part of the house to his brother, but I assumed he had done it much later, to finance his immigration to America.  These records say that he sold it in 1853, just after he was married.  The family didn't sail to America until 1862.  So we don't know for sure where Jacob and Elizabetha lived for the 9 years, 1853-1862.  Baby Emuel was born to them in Bern in 1861 or 1862.

I think that Jacob and Elizabetha may have remained at the house and that their first children (my great-grandmother Verena) were born at the house, but now we can't be sure, since Jacob didn't own the house after his first year of marriage.

Our information has brother Johannes Rudolf paying Jacob the equivalent of $2000 in at least 2 installments.  Jacob lost the first $1000 sometime after 1854 and used the second $1000 to immigrate to America.

Maybe Jacob and Elizabetha were saving the first $1000 to buy their own place, but then, at some point, decided to use it to immigrate to America and establish a home there.  When they lost the first $1000, that delayed their departure until their brother could pay the second $1000.

I'd like to check the accuracy of a couple of addresses :)  Patric Jakob, Bergstrasse 95, 5058 Wiliberg, Switzerland.  Rene' Rindlisbacher, Buchacker 73, 5058 Wiliberg, Switzerland.  Don't worry, I'm just going to mail you two something :)

Thanks again,

Steve
  9/17/2015
 

For Julie's information, Patric is the young councilman that I met in Wiliberg this summer.

I think he emailed the village historian, Rene', and asked what Rene's sources were for the information he found on our Bachmann family.  Not a very comprehensive answer here.  It doesn't explain how Rene' knew there was a house on the Bachmann homestead since 1776, and doesn't explain where he got those family photos, coat of arms, and church documents of godfathering.

I want to send Patric and Rene' a thank you gift or card, I found what I thought were their addresses, but I had to ask Patric to make sure.  Patric writes "Please no circumstances", which and I'm waiting for a explanation of what that means.  I'm thinking he's not wanting any pay for his work on our behalf.  I can always send a gift to Rene' and a card to Patric :)

Next:  Steve writes to Julie about her upcoming trip.

My best,
Steve


Hi Steven

Yes the addresses are correct. René is spelled like this. Maybe there is no letter é on your keyboard.
Please no circumstances!

Most of René’s sources are from the building register (Lagerbuch) of the insurance company for fire (Aargauischen Brandversicherungsanstalt). These registers can now by found in the public record office of our canton Aargau in the town Aarau.

1850 - 1874: Lagerbuch inkl. Mutationskontrolle der Aargauischen Brandversicherungsanstalt: Gemeinde Wiliberg
1875 - 1898: Lagerbuch inkl. ltllutationskontrolle der Aargauischen Brandversicherungsanstalt: Gemeinde Wiliberg
1899 - 1938: Lagerbuch inkl. Mutationskontrolle der Aargauischen Brandversicherungsanstalt: Gemeinde Wiliberg



Regards
Patric














Bachman home in the 1970s, on left.








This is the house next door to the Bachman home. The Bachman home is on the left.  Taken in the 1970s by Steve





Garden in front of the Bachman home.

Bachman home on the hill, left, in Wiiberg. Mr and Mrs Stettler live there in 2015.  The 2 shades of roof are on one big Bachmann house.  On the left is an attached barn.  I think there’s a tractor in there, maybe they had 2 tractors.  The front door can barely be seen under where the 2 roofs connect.  On the right is the Suter 1930 home.  You can barely see a 3rd house behind the Suter house.  I took this photo from across the creek and up the next hill (I was actually standing in a different canton). Steve



2016 J. and P. Handy visit Wiliberg










Explanation for photograph below:

Two of the Bachmanns cutting grass in the Sacher area.




Bachman means "man of the creek".  So a creek or river runs through the middle of the crest.  Those are hills at the bottom.  I couldn't quite understand what they said about the top part.  I wrote down "prestige".  Whatever it is, it gives the Bachmanns prestige.




The Bachmanns were citizens of Bottenwil, but lived two and a half miles away in Wiliberg.  Bottenwil was a community which served as the “county seat” for Wiliberg.  Bottenwil is where the records were held.  Here is the entry for Jacob Bachman and Elizabeth Suter.  Geburt means birth in German.  Tod means death in German.  Tag means day.

In the citizens-register of Bottenwil we find on the page of the family of Jakob Bachmann-Suter the following note written by pencil:  "Nach Amjerika in dass Mormonenland" (= to America into the land of the Mormons).  The note is very faint under Elizabeth's name. I need to learn how to read  German. 






Children of Elizabeth Suter (first wife) and Jacob:

Born in Switzerland:
Maria, born the 21st of February 1854,
Verena, born the 20th of February 1857,
Jakob, born the 27th of October 1858,
Elizabetha born the 14th of March 1869
Emuel, born the 17th of August 1861

Born in Utah:
Sarah born in Winter Quarters
Rosilla, born the 26th of February 1864
Bertha, born the 19th of April 1865.
Alma, November 1866.



Children of Anna Hegetechweiler (second wife) and Jacob:

Joseph Bachman. born 8 Feb 1868, married Margaret Howard McBride, 8 Dec 1890, died 9 May 1940 (large family)

Annie Bachman born 9 Aug 1870, married William Ingles 25 Mar 1904, died 14 Aug 1926 (no children)

John Rudolf Bachman born 19 Oct 1876, Married Nellie Fordham, 1900, Emma Sewell and Helen Ellsworth, died 11 Apr 1944

Emma Scholl (full history) born 5 Dec 1887, married George Scholl, 25 May 1915, died 12 Oct 1967




2014 Visiting Jacob Bachman's Home 1973 from Kent on Vimeo.

The family came across the ocean on the Windermere

  1862 :New York City passenger list:

The family consisting of the parents, Jakob and Elizabeth and five children, Maria born the 21st of February, 1854, Verena, born the 23rd of February 1857, Jakob, born the 27th of October 1858, Elizabetha, born the 14th of March 1860 and Emuel, born the 17th of August 1861, sailed from La Havre, Franc, on the ship Windermere, the 15th of May 1862. This was the 119th Company. The ship set sail on Thursday with 109 Saints from Switzerland and France, under the Presidency of Serge L. Ballif. The Windermere had 460 immigrants on board. Elders Johannes Liedermann and frederick Goss assisted President Ballif on the voyage, also six other Elders and some Priests and teachers. The non-Mormons paid three dollars more per person than the Saints. The cost of emigration from La Havre was five dollars less than it would have been had the immigrants traveled, as heretofore via Rotterdam, Hull and Liverpool. It was the first attempt at emigrating Latter-day Saints direct from La Havre, France to America.




1889 SL Herald July 16, 1889 Jacob Bachman




1890 Ogden Standard Aug, 27, 1890 Jacob Bachman


1901 Ogden Standard May 29, 1901 Jacob Bachman




1904 Ogden Directory Jacob Emma and Bachman



1906 Ogden Jacob Emma  Bachman



1907 Ogden Standard Dec, 27, 1907 Jacob Funeral



1907 Standard Ogden Dec 23, 1907 Jacob Funeral




1934 Ogden Standard June 30, 1934 Jacob/Anna





From "Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah"





 

Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol. 4, p. 273

History as given by son, Emuel Bachman. Near the head of a little valley, which is about 6 or 8 miles long and varying in width from about a half a mile to a mile at its widest place, in the foot-hill regions of the Switzerland Alps, is a hill named Willsberg. It is about 600 feet above the base of the little valley. About half way up the hill, overlooking a beautiful small creek, is a typical Swiss house, nestled in the center of a growth of old and stately hazelnut trees. This house is the ancestral home of the Bachman family. How long the family has lived there is not known. Presumably it has lived there many generations and perhaps the family name of Bachman was taken from the residence there itself, meaning "The man of the creek, or Creek Man."

"My father, Jacob Bachman, son of Hans R. Bachman, was born here the 26th day of April 1830. He died in Ogden, Utah, December 19, 1907. My mother was Elizabeth Sutter, born in the city of Aarau, well-educated daughter of a lawyer, in whose office she served as his scrivener. They were married December 3, 1852, and joined the Church in the year 1855. They started for Utah in 1862. On arriving at Bern, Switzerland, I was born August 17 of that year. This made our family a family of 5 children leaving for Zion; Frana, Henry, Jacob, Elizabeth and Emuel (myself). Mary, the oldest of the children had died before the family started.

"Our first home in Utah was in Harrisville, in Mound Fort, Weber County. But we soon moved to Liberty in Ogden Valley. The extreme cold and want of food and clothing for his family caused my father to complain bitterly of his sacrifice of a good home and plenty in Switzerland. He became very ill, and during which time he saw the mistake of complaining, and repented. My mother, was always strong in the faith. From Liberty we moved to Eden, where, in November 1866 my mother died. In about a year my father married a widow by the name of Anna Stone who had one child. From this union there were born 4 children, making a total of 13.




Jacob and Anna:

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2010 Bachman History from K on Vimeo.




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Born April 15, 1830, Wiflisburg, Switzer-
land. Came to Utah Oct. 15, 1863, Samuel
D. White Company. High Priest. Farm-
er. Resided at Eden, Utah.



Jacob Bachman died December 19, 1907 from pneumonia, 5 days, and organic heart disease, chronic nephritis, 2 years.  
What is Organic heart disease?  OHD as it is referred as, Organic heart disease a condition wherein the heart doesn't function as it should because of any deformity or inflammation.This deformation can either be cardio or vascular in nature.Our heart consists of muscles, valves, arteries and veins which combine to pump in and out about 60-100 times per minute .The heart continues to be an efficient performer until lifestyles, habits, stress, compel it to behave abnormally. Organic heart disease is also mentioned in medical circles as cardiovascular heart disease.
chronic nephritis - a form of kidney inflammation usually secondary to another disease, such as chronic pyelonephritis. In chronic interstitial nephritis the kidney becomes small and granular with thickening of arteries and arterioles and proliferation of interstitial tissue. There may be functional abnormalities, such as urea retention, hematuria, and casts. 
Though many different causes can be to blame for the onset of chronic nephritis, one of the most common causes is an allergic reaction to medicine. This type of allergic reaction can cause both treatable and irreversible damage. Common over the counter medications, such as pain relievers, can lead to this renal failure. Prescription medications, such as those designed to combat cancer and depression, can also cause the inflammation.
Too much calcium in the blood can lead to chronic nephritis. The presence of other diseases in the body, such as chronic pyelonephritis, can also lead to the condition. As nephritis develops, it often spreads quickly, with several symptoms often displayed. Both laboratory and imaging tests may be conducted to properly identify the disease. Though early stages may be treated with lifestyle changes and medication, if this disease progresses without treatment it can lead to death.  Kent
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Research:



There is confusion regarding where the Bachman family came from.  Depending on what record you're looking at, they came from Wiliberg or Bottenwil or Bözberg, etc.  Dr. J. J. Siegrist, in a May 31, 1972, letter to me, explained the Bachmans' origin and a little bit about Swiss genealogy:

5001 AARAU, den 31. Mai 1972
Dear Mr. Bingham, your letter of May 13 can be answered as follows:
General Explanations about the political structure and citizenship in the Swiss Confederation (the official title of Switzerland after 1848):
1.  Switzerland is a confederation of 25 more or less sovereign states (= cantons).  The cantons have the same status as your states in the USA (being just much smaller):  own government, parliament, jurisdiction, police force, etc.  One of these states in the canton of Aargau.  These cantons consist of semi-autonomous communities, grouped in districts (= Bezirke).
2.  In Switzerland we have the system of village-, town-, or city/community- citizenship.  That means, that Swiss citizenship is bound to citizenship in a community, earned a) either by birth, or b) or by a decree + buying oneself in.  The office of each Swiss community has a register of its citizens (living in the community or elsewhere).  These registers were started some years after 1820; before this time the church-parishes had to keep registers of marriage, birth and death.  The birthplace is in Switzerland of almost no legal consequence.
3.  The citizens-registers (Bürgerregister) are kept in the archives of the communities.  In the archives of communities being parish centers, one will also find the old church-registers.
The descendants of Rudolf Bachmann (1759-1810), Sacherruedi (surname of the family) [Steve's note:  This is the only place that the name, Sacherruedi, appears (another mystery).], of Bottenwil, living in Wiliberg (both communities in the Canton of Aargau, district of Zofingen):
     See the enclosed genealogies.  Your information about the dates seems to be rather correct.
     These Bachmanns were citizens of Bottenwil, but lived in Wiliberg.  Bottenwil belongs to the parish of Schöftland (Canton of Aargau, district of Kulm); Wiliberg belongs to the parish of Reitnau (Canton of Aargau, district of Zofingen).  All the Bachmann children were born in Wiliberg-- with the exception of Samuel (?)  (Emuel is no first name.)  [Steve's note:  I believe that Verena's brother was actually named Emuel, although in US censuses, his name has alternate spellings, one being Emil, a fairly common European first name.  Perhaps his name, Emuel, was one-of-a-kind like my grandson, Draven, or maybe his name was the more popular Emil, creatively misspelled from the beginning.]
     Samuel (?), according to your notes, born 1862 in Bern, Canton of Bern, Switzerland, cannot be found neither in the citizens-register of Bottenwil, nor in the church registers of reitnau.  Therefore the family of Jakob Bachmann left the region of Bottenwil/Wiliberg forever between March 14, 1860, and August 17, 1862.  In the citizens-register of Bottenwil we find on the page of the family of Jakob Bachmann-Suter the following note written by pencil:  "Nach Amjerika in dass Mormonenland" (= to America into the land of the Mormons).  [Steve's note:  There is something so dramatic about this final entry, knowing what a sacrifice Jacob and Elizabeth made at this time, leaving the land forever that their ancestors had inhabited for centuries.  They weren't forced to leave Switzerland by any homeland crisis or by poverty--  Their hearts had been touched by Mormon missionaries, and they were going to a "promised land".] 


About the localities:     In this respect your information seems to be rather poor.  See the enclosed lcopy of a map showing the communities of the canton of Aargau--  The modern canton of Aargau does exist only since 1803.
     The following localities belonged before 1798 to the province of Lenzburg in the old state of Bern, since 1803 to the district of Zofingen in the canton of Aargau:
     Bottenwil (first mentioned 1189 as Botanwile), belonging to the parish of Schöftland.  There are quite many Bachmanns still residing in Bottenwil.  Inhabitants 1960:  671 Persons.
     Wiliberg, bore up to the 18th century another name:  Bonhusen.  It belongs to the parish of Reitnau.  Nowadays there are no Bachmanns living in Wiliberg.  Inhabitants 1960:  137 persons.
     The following locality belonged before 1798 to the province of Schenkenberg in the old state of Bern, since 1803 to the district of Brugg in the canton of Aargau:
     Bözberg (first mentioned 1189 as Bozeberch).  This community was 1872 separated in Ober (Upper)- and Unter (Lower)- bözberg.  The church stand in Unterbözberg.  The family Suter comes from Unterbözberg, where there still exist some families of this name.  Inhabitants 1960:  542 persons.
     That is all our office can do for you.  The secretaries of the communities have neither the spare time nor the training to do genealogical research work (most of them are not able to read the old church registers).  For further inquiries you therefore better hire a genealogist and for this purpose address yourself to the secretary of the Schwizerische Gesellschaft für Familienforschung.
Sincerely yours
STAATSARCHIV DES KANTONS AARGAU
Der Adjunkt:
J.J. Siegrist



Diary:  My visit to Verena's birthplace in Switzerland.  I traveled with my then wife to Aargau Kanton Switzerland in July 1972 when I was 28.  The following is what I wrote about that visit:
     In Switzerland, the foremost historian of Aargau Kanton helped me find the Bachmann home in Wiliberg.  The Bachmanns, although citizens of Bottenwil, have lived in Wiliberg for many hundreds of years.  We drove to Wiliberg and asked an elderly resident if there were any Bachmanns still living in Wiliberg.  He said that the last Bachmann family had moved out around 1920, but they still owned some forest nearby.  Also, he directed us to the Bachmann home where Verena Bachmann Hill was born and where the brothers, Jakob and Hans Rudolf had lived before they joined the Church and before Jakob left for the USA.     The house is very big and still in good shape, having been enlarged and remodeled from time to time.  It is not the only house on the hillside; in fact, there are houses on either side of the old Bachmann home.  One house is inhabited by a Suter family, but I don't know whether they are relations of Elisabetha Suter, Verena's mother.  The Bachmann home is not on top of a hill as I had previously read; it is on the slope.  In fact, we had to come down the slope quite a ways from the elderly gentleman's home to find the Bachmann home.  The little valley that includes Wiliberg could be out of a storybook or a National Geographic magazine.  It is green and beautiful.  When I saw the home and valley, I felt I knew the sacrifice that Jakob and his wife had made-- to leave this paradise and follow their faith to Utah.  Now, of course, I would rather live in the USA, but back in those days Utah was such a hard and barren land that I am sure Jakob often wondered if he had made the right decision.

     We climbed the hill again, and at the top we looked over into another valley at the church at Reitnau where the Bachmanns had attended and where the children were christened.  I would estimate that the church is 2 miles from the home, but I could be off on this.  Our historian friend said that there has been a church standing on this site since 1045 A.D.  (I believe that was the date.)  At any rate it was a very historical chapel.


     We found Erich Bachmann, a great-grandson of Hans Rudolf, in Kölliken about 5 miles from Wiliberg.


     Evidently Hans Rudolf's younger son (also named Jakob, the same name as his uncle, our ancestor, who had left for America) had moved to Kölliken to be closer to the railway as he had begun to branch out from forestry to transporting.  At this time he was interested in importing McCormick farm implements.


     Erich was this nephew Jakob's grandson.  Erich was about 36-years old, and his wife, Suzy, about 27.  They had been married about 4 years--  the Swiss not marrying as early as we Americans.  Erich confirmed that his grandfather Jacob, had an older brother who had settled elsewhere in Switzerland, and that there had been a number of sisters, 4 of whom never married.  Thus, this explains why Hans Rudolf had somewhat fewer descendants in Switzerland than our Jakob has in the USA--  that and with the older marrying age.
     Erich's father, Jakob's son, had died 6 years ago of a heart attack and the transport business had grown considerably under Erich's leadership since then.  Erich has a brother who is a driver for the company.  Because of the exorbitant rent rates in Switzerland, Erich, his wife, his mother, his brother and brother's family all live in the same large home in Kölliken.  Furthermore, the Bachmanns rent out an additional portion of the house.   Also, come to think of it, the home housed the company's office and a workshop!


     Erich was quite well off, having a number of trucks and sightseeing buses.  He was glad to meet us and very hospitable.  The next day after we had met him, he had an English-speaking friend (and employee) show us around and interpret for us.  The friend drove us (very fast) to Lake Lucerne, Brünig Mountain, and Bözberg, where our great-great grandmother Elisabetha Suter was from.  In Unterbözberg, we talked to the mayor who was just recovering from a "100 years' Bözberg celebration" and was at that moment in his cherry tree.  He said that the Suter family that we were concerned about had left Bözberg many years ago and had settled in another Swiss town.  He seemed to know just which Suter family was ours--  the family whose daughter had gone to America.  I guess it was a rare thing in those early days for the comfortable Swiss to leave their country;  so, again, I believe that shows the dedication and determination of those early Swiss Mormon immigrants.


     The last evening we joined Erich, Suzy, and our interpreter for a fondue dinner in a spectacular mountaintop restaurant.  Our conversation was interesting--  my wife, Linda, a French teacher, conversed with Suzy in French.  Erich and I used the translation skills of the interpreter, Linda, and Suzy to communicate in English and Swiss-German.  I had a feeling that Erich understood a lot more French and English than he let on.


     Erich was very interested in the story of Jakob and Elisabetha's trials in America, and he was very interested in getting a copy of any genealogy that we might have.  He and his English-speaking friend were interested in the Church and I believe that we changed a few opinions in this respect.  Erich asked why Hans Rudolf had not remained a Mormon, and we could only give him our supposition that times were tough for Mormons in those days, and there were many temptations to try one's faith.


     I hope to correspond with Erich and his wife and eventually see him again.
     One more thing--  Erich mentioned that they had Hans Rudolf's tombstone in their house.  I didn't understand why.
                                                                                              
                                     Steven R. B
                                                                                                                                         July, 1972
 
From Prominent Men of Utah:

BACHMAN, JACOB (son of Hans R. Bachman, born April
3, 1791, and Elizabeth Aerna, born April 10, 1791, both of
Switzerland: married Sept. 26, 1824). He was born April
15, 1830, Wiflisburg, Switzerland. Came to Utah Oct. 15,
1863, Samuel D. White company.

Married Elizabeth Sutter of Bozberg, Switzerland. Their
children: Mary b. Feb. 21, 1854, died; Frana b. Feb. 23,
1857, m. Henry A. Hill; Jacob b. Oct. 27, 1858; Elizabeth b. 



Research:

Jacob's home in Wiliberg

Hello Patrick, I find you and your colleagues' favorable reaction to our
visit very touching.  There are apt to be 3 of us visiting Wiliberg the
afternoon of May 23 (Saturday) or anytime May 24 (Sunday), whichever would
be more convenient for you. 

Ours is quite a dramatic story of the two Williberg brothers, Jakob and Hans
Rudolf Bachmann, who were very close at one time, I think they even lived
together in the big Wiliberg house.  In the beginning, they both wanted to
immigrate to Utah, USA, but because of unfortunate circumstances (the loss
of traveling money), only Jakob and his family made the journey.  As the
years went by the 2 families grew apart and even forgot one another. 

The Swiss remnants of Hans Rudolf's family are represented by Erich and Suzy
Bachmann of Kolliken (Bachmann AG Transporte Schweiz.)  I met Erich and Suzy
in 1972, became friends, wrote for many years, but now have lost touch.  It
would be great to see them again.  I'm not sure, however, whether Erich
would want to be a "family representative."  Erich was a little shy, as I
recall, but Suzy was outgoing.  I have a feeling that maybe after our 1972
visit, the Kolliken relatives may have been inundated by their Western USA
tourist relatives.  There are many more of us than of them.  It would be
wonderful if the Kolliken Bachmanns were invited to join us, but I'm not
getting my hopes up :)

If you're interested, I could round up some short histories and diaries
pertaining to the Bachmanns of Wiliberg, and I could email that information
to you..  I will be traveling throughout Europe beginning Wednesday, May 6.

Best wishes to our Swiss friends,
Steve Bingham

2015 Where was Jacob born and raised?

Kent--

My problem is the claim that the Bachmann house was the only one on the hill.  The date you have on Emma's complete history is 1958?  While the historian said that the Bachman house dates back to 1776, the house next door, belonging to the Suters has "1930 J.S." in large letters on the outside.  (This is the house that 43 years ago I thought was the Bachmann house.)  So the Suter house also would have been right next door there in 1958. 

I believe that Suter is a common name in Switzerland (as is Bachmann apparently).  The historian said that this Suter family wasn't related to our Suter family (but Jakob's first wife Elizabetha was a Suter).  A coincidence?  Off the subject-- The Sutter of Sutter's Mill in CA where gold was first discovered was from Switzerland.

The historian pointed to a small building on the Suter property and said that that building was the oldest one in the valley. 

The present owner of the Bachman house, Mr. Stettler, produced a deed of sale from Jakob Bachman--  the date on the deed indicates that this Jakob was our Jakob's nephew, who is pictured as a boy in the Hans Rudolf photo.  Mr. Stettler said that he has lived in the home for 80 years.

Thinking about this, one has to wonder who the most credible authority is--  Emma's researcher, the historian I met, or neither. 

So if the Bachman house dates way back to 1776, maybe the oldest little house next door was one that the Bachmanns first inhabited.  Then they built a bigger house.  If the "1930" is the date the Suter house was built, that was about the time that the Stettler's obtained the Bachmann house, so maybe there really isn't any relationship between the Bachmanns and this Suter family.  But why are the two big houses so close to one another?

Interestingly, Mr. Stettler remembers when he was young, that there was the name Baumann over the front door.  Which makes me think that maybe it was the Baumanns who first built the house in 1776,  Then the Bachmanns came from Bottenwil (a nearby village of which the Bachmanns remained citizens in 1972) and bought the house and land from the Baumanns.

I'll send this to Wiliberg and see what the historian has to say about it. 

Am I correct that Emma wrote her history in 1958?  I wonder if her historian did his research around 1958.  Would you see what you have on that date?  That would help me when I communicate with the historian who I met.

S

Hello Steven

It will be a pleasure helping you to find the house. We even forwarded your
picture and the excerpt to our village historian. Besides helping us to
locate the house, he may even provide you with information about the house
and it’s residents in the past.

We already have an assumption, but we like to investigate a little more.

If the date of your visit fits into our schedule, a delegation would like to
meet you and hopefully show you the house.

Can we still reach you by mail, once you are on route? If not, how should we
communicate?


Regards
Patric Jakob



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Bachman, Jacob

Note
Mormon Pioneer of 1863.
(son of Hans R. Bachman, born April 3, 1791, and Elizabeth Aerna, born April 10, 1791, both of Switzerland; married September 26, 1824). He was born April 15, 1830, Wiflisburg, Switzerland. Came to Utah October 15, 1863, Samuel D. White company.
Married:Elizabeth Sutter of Bozberg, Switzerland.
Their children:
  1. Mary, born February 21, 1854, died;
  2. Frana, born February 23, 1857, married Henry A. Hill;
  3. Jacob born October 27, 1858;
  4. Elizabeth, born March 14, 1860, married W. H. Reeder;
  5. Emuel born August 17, 1862, married Mary Jane Heninger;
  6. Rosilla, born February 26, 1864, married Moroni D. Ferrin March 6, 1889;
  7. Bertha born April 19, 1865, married A. J. Stallings July 3, 1885;
  8. Alma born November, 1866, died December 25, 1890.
Family resided at Lynn and Eden, Weber county, Utah.
Married:Anna Hazel Sweiler April, 1867, at Salt Lake City (daughter of Anna Sweiler), who was born September 29, 1847, Ottenbach, Switzerland.
Their children:
  1. Joseph born February 8, 1868, married Maggie McBride December 8, 1890;
  2. Annie born August 9, 1870, married William Ingles March 10, 1901;
  3. John R. born October 19, 1875, married Nellie Fordham August 19, 1900;
  4. Emma Josephine born December 8, 1887.
Family home Eden, Utah.
High priest. Farmer.
Sources:
Research questions:
1.  Political/Religious and Community relationships:  What are the titles of the 3 officials I met, and what areas are they over? Can you tell me about the relationship between Wilberg and Bottenwil.  Is the parish for Wilberg named Bottenurl?  Is there a parish church? 

2.  Wilberg:  Where are the rest of the Wiliberg houses?  There were the 2 business-- restaurant and building materials.  Is that all?  How many homes are in Williberg? Is Emma accurate when she days the Bachman’s were in the logging business? Where are the records kept for Wiliberg residence in the 1800s.

3.  Community?  Patrik, why did you choose to live in Wiliberg, and the others?  Good place to raise kids?

4.  Restaurant:  The restaurant was named Mooseräge.  I noticed Mooseräge on a signpost as if it was the name of an area or village?  What does that word mean?

5.  Historical accuracy? What do you think of Emma's first paragraph about the Bachmann house?  Is Emma accurate?

6.  Adjacent home:  The neighbors had 1930, JS on their house.  Is that when the home was built?   Just before Mr. Stettler was born.  Why is the "oldest Wiliberg house" on their property.  Why is the house so close to the Bachmann house? Where are the property lines for these two homes?  How much acreage does each house own? Can we get a platt map?

7. Jacob Bachmann home.  There was a house built there in 1776, Jakob Bachmann was born there 1830.  The first owners appeared to be a Baumann family.  Stettler has the deed where his father (?) purchased the house from Jakob's nephew Jakob.  How can we get a copy of the deed?

8.  Cutting grass:  What about the 2 Bachmann's in the picture cutting grass?  Who are they? Are they cutting grass for cows? What is known about the photograph?  Where was it found?

9.  Family photograph:  What does the name of Sacherruedi mean? , and why Has Rudolf has "Müller" in his name? How can we trace what happened to each member of the family in the photograph?  Where are the records found?  church?  canton?

10.  The church and cemeteries.  Serves the entire valley?  Denomination?  Church attendance?  Are headstones valued in Switzerland? How do Swiss residence view cemeteries?  where is the local cemetery?  Is it true that 80 percent of the Swiss residence get cremated?  What do most do with their ashes?

Thanks,
Steve

Future questions regarding Wiliberg:

1) Visit Bottenwil, take photos 
2) Visit Aarau and Wiliberg historian and find what kind of records exist
3)  You might have an “in” with the Kolliken Bachmans when they know the info you’ve collected on Bachmann Transporte, especially if your info come up in a google.  Remember that we know more about their history than they do, but there are some questions that we can ask them, like “What connections do you still have in the Willibert/Bottenwil area?”