Thursday, July 2, 2009

Robert Gardiner 1845 - 1927


Robert Gardiner was born in 1845 in Dundee, Scotland where he was an apprenticed confectioner. At 18 he was foreman of the “Queen’s Bakery,” which caters to the Royal Family. He married at 22 on the Emerald Isle, the very day it sailed out of Liverpool to America, to Margaret Stewart. The trip took eight weeks and was unpleasant. The original crew refused to return with the ship with good reason because the ship was lost at sea on the return voyage.

Robert was a man of remarkable physique and energy. He was known as one of the first candy makers in Salt Lake City. He owned a restaurant and candy making business at Main and 1st South, downtown Salt Lake City in what is now the Kern Building. Robert was heavily involved in railroad investments and mining. He even patented his very own copper ore extraction process. He died at 81 after living a long, vigorous and rather eventful life. He was the father of 10 children.

Full history of Robert Gardiner by Clarence Gardiner

Robert and Margaret, Pioneers of 1868

Maps

Full Timeline 

For info on Benton, Wyoming
Robert worked as a grader in Echo Canyon: Wild story of the graders of Echo Canyon 1868.
What trail did Robert and Margaret take from Benton, Wyoming?    
Info on other passengers of the Emerald Isle.

Robert Stewart Gardiner, Robert and Margaret's first son

From New York to Benton, A Scandinavian History

Robert Gardiner Quiz

Newspaper Clippings on Robert Gardiner

Robert in the SLC Directories

Robert and Margaret Pic Book Advert from K on Vimeo.


For information on how Robert Gardiner became a checker champion: Checkers



Candy Molds from K on Vimeo.










For other passengers personal memories of Robert's voyage go to Emerald Isle Memories.


John Murdoch, of New Cumnock in Ayrshire, composed these lines of farewell to his homeland:
Oh Scotland my country, my dear native home,
Thou land of the brave and the theme of my song,
Oh why should I leave thee and cross the deep sea,
To a strange land far distant lovely Scotland from thee …
But why should I linger or wish for to stay.
The voice of the Prophet is “haste, flee away. …”


General information on Liverpool immigration:

Liverpool

[Image of  Liverpool]
No seaport was more important in the Mormon migration than Liverpool. Liverpool had many natural advantages. It was centrally located between Great Britain and Ireland. It was quite accessible by rail from London and the eastern ports of England such as Hull. Upwards of 20,000 vessels entered and left Liverpool each year. The traveler would see a forest of masts, for the harbor was filled with crafts of every description.
Liverpool was the site where the first LDS missionaries landed in Britain on 19 July 1837. It was the headquarters of the Church in Britain from 1842 to 1929.
[Image of  Liverpool] Albert Docks looking toward the liver buildings
The five impressive buildings which form the Albert Dock complex stand as a reminder of Liverpool's history as a great and prosperous port. Designed and built for Jesse Hartley for the sum of £514,475 8s 1d, and opened by Prince Albert in 1846, these imposing buildings were once overflowing with precious cargoes from foreign lands. The Dock Traffic Office, now home to Granada T.V.'s News Centre was added in 1848 and, in 1852, the Cooperage and Dock Master's House completed the scheme.
However, Docks built to accomodate sailing ships could not provide deep enough water for the new steamships, and after 1890 trade declined, leaving the Albert Dock largely disused until its closure in 1972.
Following a spectacular refurbishment the Albert Dock was restored to its former glory and is now once again a centerpiece of the renowned Merseyside waterfront. The Albert Dock represents Britains largest group of grade one listed buildings and contains one and a quarter million square feet of floor space.
Emigration Gallery
Morman Immigrants Statue Mersy photo"Liverpool was one of the major centers of emigration. Millions of emigrants left England’s northern port for America’s shores, coming from other lands throughout Europe. One of my ancestors from Wales probably sailed from the here in the 1850s, a Mormon. In fact the port of Liverpool played such a role in immigration, the Mormon church of America has erected a stature of a family looking forward to a journey to the west. For ancestry searchers Liverpool might be an important stop on the backward journey."





Robert, Margaret and Alfred used some Perpetual Emigration Funds to come to Zion. Their names are on the PEF list:

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July 4, 1868, Bristol Mercury News, England: (A condenser is an apparatus that takes seawater and distills it so it is drinkable. Fortunately Robert had the keys to the commissary so he was able to boil his own water possibly saving his life.
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September 14, 1868 Deseret Evening News:










Robert and Margaret came to America in 1868 on a ship called the Emerald Isle:



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Attached is a sailing card for the Emerald Isle (Robert, Margaret and Alfred Gardiner sailed on it).  The card is several years older than 1868, but it is the most contemporary picture of the Emerald Isle of which I am aware (not much of a picture of the ship):




This card recently sold for $2,200.

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Emerald Isle

Ship: 1736 tons: 215' x 42' x 21'
Built: 1853 by Trufant & Drummond at Bath, Maine

A famous clipper packet, the full-rigged Emerald Isle carried a total of 1280 Mormons in three voyages across the Atlantic Ocean.

The first passage began on 30 November 1855 at Liverpool with 350 Saints on board. Elder Philemon C. Merrill and his counselors, Elders Joseph France and Thomas B. H. Stenhouse, presided over the emigrant company. Captain George B. Cornish, a veteran mariner, commanded the vessel. In 1848 he was listed as master of the 895-ton ship Sheridan. The crossing was marked by some damage caused by high winds and heavy seas, the deaths of two children, and three marriages. After a relatively fast crossing of twenty-nine days the ship arrived on 29 December at New York harbor.

Almost four years later, on 20 August 1859, the Emerald Isle again skippered by Captain Cornish sailed out of Liverpool with fifty-four Saints aboard-fifty from Switzerland and Italy and four from England. Elder Henry Hug was in charge of the company. After a forty-two-day passage, of which there are no details, the vessel arrived on 1 October at New York.

This same ship began her third voyage with Mormon emigrants on 20 June 1868 at Liverpool. There were 876 Saints in the company, of which 627 were from Scandinavia and the rest from the British Isles. Elder Hans Jensen Hals presided over the company. His counselors were Elders James Smith and John Fagerberg. On this crossing the ship was commanded by a Captain Gillespie. After six days the square-rigger put into Queenstown harbor to take on fresh water, since the equipment to distill sea water for culinary use had broken down. On 29 June the voyage resumed, but life on shipboard became increasingly unpleasant. The officers and crew treated the Saints harshly, and Elder Hals protested to the captain and reminded him of the contractual and legal rights of the passengers. On one occasion a mate attacked a Sister Saunders, and a "Brother Jensen" pulled the mate away and chastised him. Soon a group of sailors threatened violence but were subdued after the master reprimanded the offender. According to the Church Emigration record, no other emigrating company was known to have received such bad treatment. "Fortunately this is the last company of Scandinavian Saints which crossed the Atlantic Ocean in a sailing vessel." However, it was not just the treatment from the ship's of officers and crew that created unpleasantness, but the water became stagnant and unfit for use, causing much sickness among the emigrants. No less than thirty- seven deaths occurred. Although many children died of measles, it was felt that the drinking water contributed to the high death rate. During the three days of quarantine in the New York harbor thirty-eight sick emigrants were taken ashore. On 14 August-after a fifty-five-day passage-the Saints landed at Castle Garden.

Described by her owners-Tapscott's Line-as a half clipper in model and a packet clipper in rig, the Emerald Isle hailed out of New York and was the largest vessel built at Bath, Maine, until the 1860s. She was somewhat full bodied, sharp, and heavily sparred. She was a three-decker but also had a forecastle deck with two large houses for a galley, storerooms, and crew's quarters and a small cabin abaft the main hatch. The first lower deck contained a steerage cabin with a double tier of staterooms on each side running forward to the main hatch. Each of these staterooms had eight berths. This graceful ship had a figurehead of a dog in the act of leaping. Her stern was half round with a carved moulding which had the Harp of Erin in the center, an American Eagle on the right, and a dog on the left. Underneath were written the mottoes on the Irish and American coat of arms-Erin-go-Bragh and E Pluribus Unum. The Emerald Isle was among the first vessels to have standing rigging of wire. In 1885 she was sailing under the Dutch flag and renamed Berendina Oriria out of Batavia.


From:
Scandinavian Emigrant Ship Descriptions and Voyage Narratives (1852-1868)
from Ships, Saints, and Mariners by Conway B. Sonne and other sources.

Small world special note: Conway B. Sonne's son Alma Sonne set Kent Gardiner apart for his mission to the British South Mission in 1965.

From another source:

The last two passages in sailing ships probably represent the worst and best experiences of Latter-day Saint emigrants crossing the Atlantic. In 1868, the ships Emerald Isle and Constitution . arrived in New York City within a few days of each other. No emigrant company received such harsh treatment as did the Saints aboard the Emerald Isle, in sharp contrast with the experiences of Saints on the two previous voyages of that vessel that included Church members. Officers and crew were abusive, a mate molested a young woman, sailors threatened violence, and water became unfit to use. "It was a ghastly voyage," recalled N. P. Nielson, a Danish convert. There were no less than thirty-seven deaths, and during quarantine in New York, thirty-eight sick passengers were taken ashore.18 18. Andrew Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, Salt Lake City: Deseret News Press, 1927, pp. 201-2. 


Niagara Falls:
On the way to Zion Robert, Margaret and Alfred stopped at Niagara Falls and took the train across the gorge:

Note: Photos taken in 1868 of the railroad Suspension Bridge at Niagara Falls.  Robert, Margaret and Alfred stopped at Niagara Falls and crossed the Suspension Bridge on their way to Utah in August of 1868.  Trains crossed on the top deck of the bridge and pedestrians and carriages could cross on the deck underneath.  This was probably the closest thing Robert and Margaret had to a honeymoon.  It certainly wasn’t crossing the Atlantic Ocean on a crowded ship with a sadistic crew and disease and death stalking them the whole way.  Okay, maybe I am overstating things . . .   But then again, maybe not.  N














Add caption






 August 25, 1868 Deseret Evening News:





September 3, 1868 Deseret Evening News.  Robert worked for John W. Young in Echo Canyon later in the year:



September 5, 1868 Deseret Evening News:



September 19, 1868 Deseret Evening News:



September 19, 1868 Deseret Evening News:





September 24, 1868, Deseret Evening News:


October 2, 1868 Deseret Evening News: (Note: Robert Gardiner would have been working for John W. Young at this time.  FYI, the Young in Sharp & Young is not John W. Young. )


October 6, 1868, Deseret Evening News:  same story but a little easier to read: 


October 20 1968, Deseret News: 



Note: Hi everyone,  When Robert, Margaret and Alfred Gardiner arrived in Utah they stopped at the North Fork of Echo Canyon where Robert went to work for John W. Young.  The North Fork of Echo Canyon is at the head of Echo Canyon.  John W. Young had a contract to fill and cut part of the railroad grade in the North Fork of Echo Canyon.  Robert, Margaret and Alfred lived in a dugout in the side of the canyon.  I don’t know the exact date when John W. Young completed his contract work, but as can be seen from the attached clipping it was estimated that he would be done by November 15, 1868.  That is consistent with Margaret and Alfred arriving in Salt Lake City the latter part of November 1868.

Once the contract in the North Fork of Echo Canyon was complete, John W. Young and his men moved to another contract about four miles south of Ogden near the mouth of Weber Canyon.  This raises some questions for me and I am looking for some help.  Why didn’t Robert travel with Margaret and Alfred to Salt Lake City?  Was it because Robert moved on to the next contract near the mouth of Weber Canyon and Margaret and Alfred didn’t want to follow him to Ogden?  (There was no reason for Margaret and Alfred to remain in the dugout at the head of Echo Canyon.)  Did Robert join Margaret and Alfred in Salt Lake City a day or two after they arrived in Salt Lake City or was it two or three months later when the contract work near the mouth of the Weber Canyon was finished?  I think it was Eva, Robert’s daughter, that wrote Robert worked on the railroad between Echo Canyon and Ogden.  Was that  just a reference to the railroad in general or is more meant by it?  If Robert just worked at one spot at the head of Echo Canyon, why the more general reference? NG

January 27, 1969 Deseret Evening News:  A clipping that refers to John W. Young and William Snow.  Robert Gardiner worked under both men





SLC in 1866, two years later Robert saw this scene:

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Later in life he was involved in a lawsuit. 
Here is Robert's signature:



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Backside of the above photo:


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Beatrice Lenore Gardiner Low (Robert's daughter) -

In February 1870 spring came, or so it seemed to them and they moved into a dugout up in one of the many ravines on the East Bench. Here Robert built a huge adobe furnace and started his candy making. He would carry a sack of sugar home on his shoulder at night, make candy all night, and take it downtown (on his shoulder again) the next morning, bringing another sack of sugar back.

One day while he was downtown, a regular river came down the ravine and washed everything out of the dugout before Margaret could even get the baby out. She hurried to get him out on the hill where it was dry but the bedding was soaked, the precious sack of sugar was washed away; the flour had caked on the sack so hard that it was saved. That was enough dugout for them, but the baby took pneumonia and died.

He made a lot of money fast and bought a place on Main Street and a place on Second Avenue and R Street, and a place out in the Brighton Ward, part way to Saltair. They lived in the Second Avenue place for some time, but moved to Main Street where Robert had a restaurant and made candy.

Robert spent some time working on the Salt Lake Temple.
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Clarence Gardiner on Robert:

Robert Gardiner was a man of remarkable physique. His physical energy seemed boundless, and during his long life he engaged in a number of business ventures. Upon his arrival in the alley he was, of course anxious to establish himself in his chosen trade of confectioner and baker. After locating in the 20th Ward, one of his first investments was the purchase of a wheelbarrow. This he used, after building a small "candy factory; to transport sugar from downtown to his shop where he made it into candy and delivered it to the stores where he received merchandise and more sugar in payment for the candy. In this year of 1868, Zion's Cooperative Mercantile Institution was established which aided many of those who produced salable goods to dispose of them, exchanging them for the commodities they were in need of. In process of time, and by his industry and energy, Robert was able to establish himself in the downtown section where he build a flourishing business in the manufacture of all kinds of confections and later he operated a bakery and a restaurant on Main Street.

A new home was built in the 14 Ward near the center of the block immediately behind where the Kearns building now stands where the older members of his family were born. Success crowned his efforts and he accumulated what would be considered at that time a substantial fortune.

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About 1883 the family moved about six miles west of the city on a farm. The small community was known as the Brighton Ward. He gradually withdrew from the candy business and became actively engaged in several new business projects. The soil of the farm was not fertile, or the farming venture successful. The family lived on this farm until 1884 when they moved into the city.

About 1890 a severe depression occurred, after an unprecedented business "boom", which caused widespread disaster in the industrial and financial status of the country. Fortunes were wiped out, and many hereto fore independent citizens were reduced to want and extreme poverty. The Gardiner farm was lost, investments failed and the accumulated assets of years were wiped out.

Deseret Bakery:

Hi, another thought on this photo: Notice the power poles.  Electric service in Utah began in the spring of 1881 when the Salt Lake City Light, Heat, and Power Company started supplying electricity to light some of Salt Lake City's streets, businesses, and public buildings.  The next twenty years or so was a time of slow progress and faltering steps.


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Article in the New Era on Robert Gardiner's candy molds:



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Salt Lake Daily Herald, August 6, 1882:






What we know – The first mention of the Deseret Bakery or Robert’s restaurant that I have seen is an advertisement in December 1877.  The last mention of the Deseret Bakery or Robert’s restaurant that I have seen is an advertisement on July 9, 1882.  Robert did not own the two story building in which the Deseret Bakery was located.  The building was owned by a Mr. Hopwood and was immediately north of Asmussen’s jewelry store.  The address of the Deseret Bakery and Robert’s restaurant was 58 S. Main in Salt Lake City.  On April 29, 1883, a millinery business advertises as being at 58 Main.  Sometime between July 9, 1882 and April 29, 1883, Robert Gardiner closed his bakery and restaurant.

The “for sale” ad – The ad is for a two story bakery and restaurant.  The location is being leased.  That is consistent with Robert’s bakery and restaurant.  The first “for sale” ad appeared in May 1882 and the last in October 1882. The last ad for Robert’s restaurant and bakery appeared during this time (between May and October 1882.)

Is the “for sale” ad for Robert’s bakery and restaurant?  Without an address, owner name or more information, it can’t be determined for sure, but the time is right.  If it is, what is the bad health referred to in the ad?  Is that just another way of saying Robert was tired of the stress and hassle of running a bakery and restaurant?  Something else?  It does raise the question, why did Robert close what apparently was a profitable business?  NG



SLC in 1880 when Robert was there busy making candy:


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Actual photos of Robert's candy making tools:



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January 15, 1878 Salt Lake City Tribune:

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Book of Mormon from Robert to his brother Alfred:

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Close up:

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Salt Lake Herald, 1894-07-14





1899 Deseret News:








May 8, 1900: The Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office:






March 19, 1902, Salt Lake Telegram:


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Robert's Timeline: 


About ten years ago I decided to do a timeline on Robert Gardiner’s life. I thought it might take me a couple of weeks, but I am still working on it. (There was more information out there than I thought.) Over those years I have looked at a lot of old newspapers and I noticed that a Robert Gardner was mentioned in quite a few newspaper columns under “Checkers and Chess” or “Checkers”. Sometimes his last name was spelled “Gardiner”, but usually spelled “Gardner”.

Apparently there were certain moves or strategies in the checkers matches that were given names. They are referred to in the newspaper clippings. Some of them were named Dundee and Edinburgh. Of course, our Robert Gardiner was from Scotland so I could see a possible connection there. I noticed one was named “Old 14th”, and Robert had lived in the 14th Ward for a time. But I figured that there could be a Robert Gardner, unrelated to our Robert Gardiner, that played checkers in Salt Lake City. So I put the clippings in a potential connection file. Then one day one of the newspapers added a middle initial to Robert Gardner’s name. Since our Robert Gardiner did not have a middle name that was enough for me to toss all of the clippings on checkers. Now I wish I hadn’t done that.

Last weekend I came across another clipping on checkers that mentioned Robert Gardner. It also mentioned that some friends of his from Green River were in town. Since Robert Gardiner had been on a survey on the Green River that caught my attention, but I still wasn’t willing to conclude that the Robert Gardner mentioned was our Robert Gardiner. But I am now after coming across the attached article.

The information that I wanted to look up and that I mentioned in my last email was when Margaret Stewart Gardiner broke her leg. I was able to do that last night. According to H.W. Cushing’s journal, Margaret slipped and fell on January 31, 1916 and broke her leg just above her ankle. Attached is a clipping from the Salt Lake Telegram dated March 19, 1916 that refers to Robert Gardner dropping out of a state checkers tournament because his wife had recently broke her leg, keeping Robert at home.

I realize that there may have been another Robert Gardner in Salt Lake City at this time that played checkers. The references to Dundee, Edinburgh, and Old 14th could just be coincidences, and another Robert Gardner could also have friends from Green River. But the likelihood that the wives of both Robert Gardners would break their legs at about the same time is just getting too unlikely for me. So my conclusion is that the Robert Gardner/Gardiner that is mentioned in the newspapers as playing checkers is our Robert Gardiner. I think that the one clipping that gave a middle initial for Robert Gardner was a misprint, just like they misspelled his last name most of the time.

If Robert Gardiner’s descendants have a reunion sometime, maybe a checkers tournament would be in order to see who in the family inherited the “checkers gene.” I am usually pretty conservative on making conclusions, but if you think I am off here please let me know. Thanks, A GGSon



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Where did Robert and Margaret go to church? 

Clarence: "The first home of Robert and Margaret Gardiner in Salt Lake City was a dugout on the side of a hill.  Mr. Gardiner immediately began to set up in his trade of confectioner, and by thrift and ceaseless endeavor was soon able to build a fine two-story home in the 14th Ward (Second Avenue and R Street)  where some of the older children of the family of ten were born.  After acquiring a substantial fortune for those times, the family moved to a farm about six miles west of the city where the other family members were born.  (Brighton Ward) In June of 1894 the family again moved into the 14th Ward, and in the later part of 1902 they moved into the 11th Ward at 1243 Alameda Avenue which continued to be the family home until the children married and moved away."



14th Ward exterior:


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 14th Ward interior:


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14th Ward interior:



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11th Ward:


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Brighton Ward:


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During the 1800's in Sacrament Meeting everyone who knew Joseph Smith would bear their testimonies first.  Can you picture Margaret and Robert in these meeting houses, with pictures of Brigham Young in front, listening to those who knew Joseph Smith personally?  There's a picture.  Kent

Late in life Robert lived in this home at 1247 Alameda Avenue, SLC, UT.

At the time Robert Gardiner was living at the rear of 1243 Alameda, he was a widower. The only reason why he was living at the rear is because Charles Stewart Gardiner and his family were living in the main part of the house. I also think that he had a good marriage (at least from his point of view), although Robert's business ventures took him away from home quite abit. Clarence said that after Margaret Stewart Gardiner died Robert just wasn't the same because he missed Margaret so much. NG

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Hi everyone,  Attached is a photograph of Robert Gardiner, his son-in-law, William R. Gedge, and one of his great grandsons, Robert Layton, taken in 1926, the year before Robert Gardiner passed away.  N



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Finding Robert and Margaret's grave marker:



Below:
See the driveway next to the chapel.  Walk directly across 4th avenue.  See how there is a bush in the middle of the first section.  I believe they are next to that bush.  If you walk west you will find quite a few famous LDS pioneers besides the pioneers we love. Kent



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Clickable images--------------The Robert Gardiner Family----------His other children

What happened to Robert Gardiner's brothers and sisters?

Where are the members of the Robert and Margaret Gardiner family buried?

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Note: Robert Jr's grave location has been found and marked.


Markers provided by the 2010 Robert and Margaret reunion members and Gayle Reese.  Mainly Gayle.  Thank you Gayle.




























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2015 Memorial Day:

Robert's brother's grave marker.














Robert and Margaret's Gravesite from K on Vimeo.















1988 Robert Gardiner's Grave Site from K on Vimeo.



Deseret News:



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Deseret News 1927: (note error in birthplace)
Robert Gardiner, 1868 Pioneer, Dies

Robert Gardiner, Salt Lake confectioner and pioneer of 1868, died at a Salt Lake hospital Tuesday.

He was born at Inverness, Scotland, Oct. 24, 1845, and followed the trade of confectioner and baker in Dundee. On June 20, 1868 he married Margaret Stewart o board the sailing vessel “Emerald Isle” and the same day sailed with his wife for America.

On arrival in Utah he worked on the Union pacific railroad then building through Echo Canyon, and later engaged in the confectionary and baking business in Salt Lake for a number of years.
Surviving are the following children; Mrs. William R. Gedge, Salt Lake: Frederick Gardiner, Malta, Idaho: Bishop Clarence L. Gardiner, of Richards Ward, Salt lake: Mrs. Marry Cushing and Charles S. Gardiner Salt Lake; Mrs. Morris D. Low, Paris Idaho and 21 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. He also has a sister and brother in Salt Lake.

Funeral services will be held in the Richard Ward chapel Thursday, April 7, at 12 o’clock noon. Friends may view the body at the residence of Bishop Gardiner 928 Hollywood Avenue, from 9:30 to 11:30 am. Thursday


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June 27 1877 Deseret News:
Robert Gardiner aquaintance


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Dec 2, 1865:

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Robert may have apprenticed with James Brown who immigrated to Utah around 1864. Here is an article from Deseret News April 5, 1866:

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Research: Where did Robert and Margaret go to church? Clarence: "The first home of Robert and Margaret Gardiner in Salt Lake City was a dugout on the side of a hill. Mr. Gardiner immediately began to set up in his trade of confectioner, and by thrift and ceaseless endeavor was soon able to build a fine two-story home in the 14th Ward (Second Avenue and R Street) (Ward house at 181 W 200 S, near where Salt Palace is today.) where some of the older children of the family of ten were born. After acquiring a substantial fortune for those times, the family moved to a farm about six miles west of the city where the other family members were born. (Brighton Ward) In June of 1894 the family again moved into the 14th Ward, and in the later part of 1902 they moved into the 11th Ward (Ward house: 131 So, 1000 E.) at 1243 Alameda Avenue (I have pictures I took of this structure, It has been torn down.) which continued to be the family home until the children married and moved away." (I thank heaven daily that Clarence and Beatrice wrote down the histories of the Gardiners, if not we would have nothing.)


Dear Kent,

Thank you for your enquiry regarding the Queen's Bakery in Scotland. I am afraid the RWHA Archives do not hold much information on Royal Warrant Holders before 1895, when the Association was incorporated and took on a regulatory role.

The National Archives (TNA) and the Royal Archives both hold records relating to warrants granted before 1900.

There are indexes of suppliers to the Royal Household in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries at the Royal Archives, Windsor, and they also hold a full set of Court and City Registers/Royal Kalendars for mid-eighteenth to end nineteenth century (also indexed). Enquiries to the Royal Archives can be sent by post to

The Registrar
The Royal Archives
Round Tower
Windsor Castle
Windsor
Berkshire SL4 1NJ

or by email to royalarchives@royalcollection.org.uk

There is also a TNA guide to resources on warrant holders: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/familyhistory/guide/trade/royal.htm

The London Gazette published annual lists of Royal Tradesmen in an early January edition from about 1885. They are digitized and can be searched online at http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/.

I wish you the best of luck with your research

Hi everyone,  Attached is a newspaper clipping from the Salt Lake Tribune dated April 5, 1889 that discusses the Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Railway Company.  Among other things it refers to a statement signed by Robert Gardiner and the other directors of the Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Railway Company that was submitted to the President and Board of Directors of the Chamber of Commerce of Salt Lake City, Utah Territory.  Also, the statement indicates that The Salt Lake, Nevada and California Railway Company is owned by the directors of the Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Railway Company and that The Salt Lake, Nevada and California Railway Company will be consolidated with the Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Railway Company as soon as the legal requirements can be fulfilled.  The clipping contains alot of information, but I think it has been the hardest one for me to read so far.  Nathan


Hi Kent,  At the time Robert Gardiner was living at the rear of 1243 Alameda, he was a widower.  I think the only reason why he was living at the rear is because Charles Stewart Gardiner and his family were living in the main part of the house. I also think that he had a good marriage (at least from his point of view), although Robert's business ventures took him away from home quite abit.  Clarence said that after Margaret Stewart Gardiner died Robert just wasn't the same because he missed Margaret so much.  If you could send me copies of your pictures of 1243 Alameda that would be very cool.  I would really appreciate it.  N


Hi Kent,  ZCMI apparently was established in 1868.  I am pretty sure there were bakers and confectioners in Salt Lake City during the 1850's.  Robert arrived in 1868.  The statement regarding ZCMI may be correct, especially if Robert was the only one selling toy candy.  I haven't read it, but I admit that I haven't read all the histories either.  Robert certainly sold bakery items, it may be that he sold other foods as well.  I don't know, but I don't think I would characterize his business as a restaurant rather than a bakery (need to look at the information).  I will have to check out the headstone issue.  I am not sure what you are referring to.  N

If you were wondering why the draft timeline from 1900 to 1927 for Robert Gardiner that I sent you doesn't say much about candymaking, the information below from Gary Layton may help explain it.  If you want to learn more, try googling "J.G. McDonald Chocolate".  Nathan

"I can remember my mother saying that the candy business had done well until McDonalds Chocolate's came in, and then [Robert Gardiner] had been unable to compete. McDonald's Chocolate's was difficult to learn about on the net due to a certain hamburger place, but I finally found: "The factory was built in 1901, the J. G. McDonald Chocolate factory was one of Salt Lake City Utah's premier confection businesses. By 1978, however, after decades of productivity, the factory was closed and the building was used as a warehouse."


Hi everyone,  Attached is a newspaper clipping from The Salt Lake Tribune dated December 1, 1890 that refers to The Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Railway Company.  Mr. Fulton, Mr. Bates and Mr. Bacon were directors of The Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Railway Company after it consolidated with the Salt Lake, Nevada and California Railway Company.  Robert Gardiner was also a director.  Mr. Fulton was president of the company at the time of consolidation.  However, sometime between March 1890 and the fall of 1890 that changed.  In April there were notices of shares being sold for past due assessments.  It may have occurred at that time.  In any event going forward The Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Railway Company is seldom referred to in the newspapers.  Instead the papers refer to The Deep Creek Road and Mr. Bacon, a Salt Lake City banker, is referred to as the owner or proponent of that road.  (The Deep Creek Road is the same road that the Salt Lake, Nevada and California Railway Company was going to build.)  It may be that Mr. Bacon bought most or all of the shares of The Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Railway Company at public auction or he may have just been elected as president of that company.  I don't know at this point.  In any event I have not copied the numerous articles on the Deep Creek Railroad because I don't know if Robert Gardiner still had any interest in it.  Nevertheless I will continue to copy articles that refer to The Wyoming, Salt Lake and California Railway Company with the hope that I can fine out more information.  N






Hi everyone,  Attached is the information Gary Layton found on Rock Creek and "Wanroad's".  I appreciate Gary's work on this.  It was very helpful.  I think Gary found the correct spelling for "Wanroad" and I believe he located the Rock Creek referred to on the back of the photo.  I think the location of Rock Creek, about 50 miles north of Price, Utah, could be verified by going to Rock Creek and comparing the mountains in the picture with the mountains around Rock Creek.  Based upon Gary's research I believe Wanrhodes is the correct spelling.  As stated below Wanrhodes was an American Indian who moved his livestock to the Duchesne area in the winter.  Also, it turns out, Rock Creek is in the Duchesne area and partly on the Unitah and Ouray Indian Reservation.

While it is very plausible that Robert Gardiner road from Rock Creek to Wanrhodes Canyon near Spanish Fork and back, it is hard for me to come up with a reason why he would be doing that.  Also, as I read the back of the photo it appears to me that it is saying the photo was taken 1/2 mile from Wanroad's on Rock Creek.  It could very well be that the Wanrhodes, an American Indian, had a ranch or home on or near the Indian Reservation and the photo was taken 1/2  mile from his place on Rock Creek.  It might be possible to verify this by looking at the land records for the area.  Of course, that doesn't answer the question where Robert Gardiner road for 65 miles.  However, it might have been Price, Utah since Price is about 50 miles away as the crow flies.  Based upon what I know about Robert Gardiner my guess is that he was on a prospecting trip or with a surveying party when this photo was taken.  It is easier for me to imagine him riding to Price and back to file a mining claim rather than riding to an area of summer pasture and then back again.  Just some ideas for further research . . .  If anyone has more information, please share it.  (By the way, I hate to think what it would be like to ride 65 miles one way.  Never mind riding back the same distance.)  N


Hi everyone,  Attached is a newspaper clipping from The Deseret News dated October 8, 1873 that mentions Robert Gardiner.  (Look under "A Powerful Argument".)  Most of the newspaper clippings that I have sent out I have had for awhile, but I just send them as I get the time to organize them.  This article I was about to throw away because I wasn't sure it was our Robert Gardiner.  I did not realize that our Robert Gardiner lived on the north bench in Salt Lake City.  However, a couple of weeks ago I saw in the Church News an article on the anniversary of the Salt Lake City 20th Ward.  I knew that Robert Gardiner had lived in the 20th Ward prior to 1877 so I read the article.  The following quotes caught my eye, "the Salt Lake Twentieth Ward was sliced off from the Eighteenth Ward and created on a sagebrush-covered hill on the city's north slope" and "Twentieth Ward boundaries were simply from "A" Street east, and from South Temple Street north."  Base upon that article and a Salt Lake City gazetteer for 1874 I am confident that the article refers to our Robert Gardiner.  N




Hi everyone,  Attached is a copy of a document prepared by Robert Gardiner.  I like how he clarifies how his name should be spelled.  N





Hi everyone,  Attached is a newspaper clipping from The Deseret News dated June 27, 1877 that refers to Robert Gardiner.  Look under "Circulating Magazine".  When I read the clipping I could envision it referring to our Robert Gardiner.  Because Robert had such diverse interests such as confectionery, railroad investments, invention of copper ore leaching process, mining, etc.I envision Robert as a thinker.  He also seems to have been a fairly articulate writer based upon the few things that I have seen of his that he wrote.  However, without more corroborating evidence I was about to throw the clipping away.

Before throwing it away I decided to do a Google search for the names of the other individuals in the article.  A Google search for "A.N. McFarlane" brought up several hits including one in the BYU Library.  Being in Utah I thought this might be a likely choice.  It turns out it was a journal for Andrew Ferguson, who was a missionary in Scotland.  That journal mentions James Gardiner, Robert's father, as well as A.N. McFarlane.  In my next email I will hopefully provide you with a link to the journal as well as more information on why I feel comfortable that the Robert Gardiner referred to in the attached newspaper clippling is our Robert Gardiner.  N

June 27, 1877 Deseret News:



Hi everyone,  Attached is a newspaper clipping from The Deseret News dated September 9, 1868 that mentions Captain Holman's and Mumford's wagon trains (second page, bottom of first column).  Both companies included passengers from the Emerald Isle.  Most of the Danish Saints traveled with Captain Holman and most of the English Saints traveled with Captain Mumford, including Robert Gardiner, Margaret Stewart Gardiner, and Alfred Gardiner.  Apparently there was some antagonism between the two groups (lingering effects of the Tower of Babel no doubt).  Captain Mumford's company traveled by mule teams, while Captain Holman's company traveled by ox teams.  As a result, Mumford's company arrived in Salt Lake City a few days before Holman's company.  N

September 9, 1968 Deseret News:


Hi everyone, Attached is a photograph of The Presidents and Secretary of the Third Quorum of Seventy taken about 1890. They are Jenson, Andrew, 1850-1941; Smith, George Albert, 1870-1951; Taylor, Moses Whittaker, 1862-1922; Duncan, Homer, 1815-1906; Barnes, Arthur Franklin, 1861-1927; Hower, Charles Ross, 1860-1939; Bywater, George Gwillym, 1828-1889; and Miner, Aurelius, 1832-1913. Through the process of elimination, I think Aurelius Miner is the person sitting down on the far left holding a cane (my best guess). Aurelius Miner married Robert Gardiner and Margaret Stewart on June 20, 1868 aboard the Emerald Isle in Liverpool harbor. N



Hi everyone,  Attached are two clippings from the Salt Lake Tribune.  The one dated September 30, 1897 is just for background information.  The one dated October 2, 1897 refers to Robert Gardiner.  At first I wasn't sure if "Robert Gardner" was our "Robert Gardiner", but then I noticed that the voting place for precinct 22 was at 242 West 1st South in Salt Lake City.  Clarence wrote that Robert Gardiner moved to 1st West and 1st South from Brighton in 1894,  the 1894-1895 Salt Lake City directory lists Robert Gardiner as living at 221 West 1st South, and the 1897 Salt Lake City directory lists Robert Gardiner living at 5 Aikens Court.  I am not sure if 5 Aikens Court was just a name change for 221 West 1st South, but if not they were very close.  (Another research project.)  Another item to note is that Robert Gardiner apparently changed political parties (from Democrat to Republican).  I noticed in one of the papers that Emmeline Wells was a Republican.  (I believe that Republicans were generally for women's suffrage at that time while Democrats were against it.)  Clarence mentions that Margaret Gardiner was one of "Emmeline's girls."  I don't know if that means Margaret was a close friend to Emmeline Wells or just a supporter of women's suffrage.  But in any event that may be why Robert Gardiner changed parties (just speculation on my part).  N

Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping from the Deseret Evening News dated December 18, 1909 that refers to the Pixton, Teasdale, Gardner store (first paragraph).  Apparently this store was going to be torn down to make way for the new Kearns building.  I believe the Gardner referred to is J. P. Gardner (no relation), a clothier and businessman.  However, in a newspaper article that I sent out some time ago (attached) it refers to Robert Gardiner as holding "out at the back of S.P. Teasdel's old store".  This would seem to corroborate Clarence Gardiner's brief history.  According to Clarence LeRoy Gardiner, when Clarence LeRoy Gardiner was born Robert Gardiner and his family were “living in a home immediately back of where the Kearns Building now stands on Main Street, between 1st and 2nd South” in Salt Lake City, Utah.  According to Clarence LeRoy Gardiner, it was near this home that Robert Gardiner had established his candy factory.  N


October 22, 2009
Dear Mr. Gardiner,

Thank you for your enquiry. We should be able to make photocopies of MS
17/9/20/2,4 & 6 at a cost of  £5.06. MS 17/9/20/1 is just an envelope,
while MS 17/9/20/3 and MS 17/9/20/5 are copies of 4 and 6. Unfortunately
the book KLoc 373.413 1 A 172 is too fragile to copy. To o order copies
please complete the attached form and return it together with a cheque
(payable in £ sterling) made payable to the University of Dundee to:

Photocopying Orders
Archive, Records Management, and Museum Services
Tower Building
University of Dundee,
Nethergate,
Dundee
Scotland
United Kingdom
DD1 4HN

Yours sincerely,

Kenneth Baxter

Hi Kent

Thank you for your enquiry about the founder of Morgan Academy, Dundee.  I have passed your enquiry to two colleagues.  Stuart Allan is a former Chairman of Morgan Academy Former Pupils' Association and is an authority on the legal issues which had to be overcome to carry out the wishes of John Morgan.  Iain Flett is the City Archivist in Dundee and is an amazing source of information.  I am sure they will be able to help you.

With every good wish

Regards

David

October 26, 2009

Dear Mr Gardiner
The City Registrar runs a family search service and I copy this to him to ask if he can help you in any way.
I also "bcc" it to the Morgan FP Association.
Yours sincerely
Iain Flett

Hi Kent,  Thanks for the information on the PEF.  Do you know if they paid it back?  I am still doing research on James Brown, but it looks like he is the right one.  Both Robert Gardiner and James Brown were in the Aberdeen Branch at the same time.  The censuses list James Brown as a confectioner and pastry chef.  The 1861 Scottish census lists Robert as a pastry cook apprentice.  So far it is just circumstantial, but it seems unlikely that Robert would apprentice with another James Brown when there was one in his branch who was a confectioner, pastry chef, etc.  N

January 8, 2010
Hi everyone,  Based upon a few emails I have received I can tell that I didn’t explain clearly why I think the James Brown that emigrated to Salt Lake City in 1864 and that I have sent information on recently is the same James Brown that Robert Gardiner apprenticed with in Scotland.  The James Brown that emigrated to Salt Lake City from Scotland in 1864 was in the Aberdeen Branch with Robert Gardiner in the early 1850’s.  (My impression is that it was hard to get an apprenticeship in Scotland in the 1850’s and 1860’s; good jobs were likely scarce.  But the church connection would explain how Robert was able to secure one.)

According to the 1851 and 1861 Scotland Censuses James Brown was a Confectioner/Pastry Chef, if my memory is correct.  Robert Gardiner is listed as a Pastry Cook apprentice in the 1861 Census, again if my memory is correct.  I am still trying to tie down the connection some more.  But it seems unlikely that Robert Gardiner would have known another James Brown that also was a confectioner/pastry chef to apprentice with, although it is possible.  Of course, that would mean that Robert Gardiner would have worked with someone else or did something else between 1864 and 1868.

I would also like to find out more about the “Queens Bakery” as well.  I don’t know if James Brown ever made a cake for Queen Victoria, but he apparently had the talent to do so.  N

Checkers Marh 4, 2010 Hi everyone, About ten years ago I decided to do a timeline on Robert Gardiner’s life. I thought it might take me a couple of weeks, but I am still working on it. (There was more information out there than I thought.) Over those years I have looked at a lot of old newspapers and I noticed that a Robert Gardner was mentioned in quite a few newspaper columns under “Checkers and Chess” or “Checkers”. Sometimes his last name was spelled “Gardiner”, but usually spelled “Gardner”. Apparently there were certain moves or strategies in the checkers matches that were given names. They are referred to in the newspaper clippings. Some of them were named Dundee and Edinburgh. Of course, our Robert Gardiner was from Scotland so I could see a possible connection there. I noticed one was named “Old 14th”, and Robert had lived in the 14th Ward for a time. But I figured that there could be a Robert Gardner, unrelated to our Robert Gardiner, that played checkers in Salt Lake City. So I put the clippings in a potential connection file. Then one day one of the newspapers added a middle initial to Robert Gardner’s name. Since our Robert Gardiner did not have a middle name that was enough for me to toss all of the clippings on checkers. Now I wish I hadn’t done that. Last weekend I came across another clipping on checkers that mentioned Robert Gardner. It also mentioned that some friends of his from Green River were in town. Since Robert Gardiner had been on a survey on the Green River that caught my attention, but I still wasn’t willing to conclude that the Robert Gardner mentioned was our Robert Gardiner. But I am now after coming across the attached article. The information that I wanted to look up and that I mentioned in my last email was when Margaret Stewart Gardiner broke her leg. I was able to do that last night. According to H.W. Cushing’s journal, Margaret slipped and fell on January 31, 1916 and broke her leg just above her ankle. Attached is a clipping from the Salt Lake Telegram dated March 19, 1916 that refers to Robert Gardner dropping out of a state checkers tournament because his wife had recently broke her leg, keeping Robert at home. I realize that there may have been another Robert Gardner in Salt Lake City at this time that played checkers. The references to Dundee, Edinburgh, and Old 14th could just be coincidences, and another Robert Gardner could also have friends from Green River. But the likelihood that the wives of both Robert Gardners would break their legs at about the same time is just getting too unlikely for me. So my conclusion is that the Robert Gardner/Gardiner that is mentioned in the newspapers as playing checkers is our Robert Gardiner. I think that the one clipping that gave a middle initial for Robert Gardner was a misprint, just like they misspelled his last name most of the time. If Robert Gardiner’s descendants have a reunion sometime, maybe a checkers tournament would be in order to see who in the family inherited the “checkers gene.” I am usually pretty conservative on making conclusions, but if you think I am off here please let me know. Thanks, N

Hi everyone,  Attached is a copy of the inside cover of a Book of Mormon that Robert Gardiner gave to his brother, Alfred, for Christmas 1882.  Apparently, Donald Gardiner had the book and gave it to one of his nephews.  N  Ray Gardiner, son of Lester Gardiner.  N



August 30, 1881Salt Lake Tribune




September 7, 1881 Salt Lake Tribune:

Kent,  I have an address for Robert Gardiner as the south side of Garden, corner Cottonwood. Today I believe that would be south side of 2nd Avenue, corner R street (I don't know which corner).  What makes you believe that Robert had a dugout there?  Chris,  How far away from your Church building is 2nd Ave and R Street?  N

September 10, 2010
The address is from an 1874 directory.  Based upon Beatrice's history it sounds like they moved from the ravine after the flood in 1870 (or at least out of the dugout).  I assumed that they had a house of some kind in 1874, but maybe not.  N

September 10, 2010
Chris,  Thanks for the information.  The address I had was from an 1874 directory.  Beatrice’s history seems to indicate that they did not go back to living in a dugout after they were flooded out in 1870.  So I don’t know where the dugout was.  Both Robert and Margaret were buried in the City Cemetery and Russell has agreed to let Kent take digital pictures of Clarence’s journal.  Russell had told me that there wasn’t any family history information in the journal.  But I am always looking for information about Robert Gardiner’s family no matter what it might be.  N
Kent, I was going through old emails and came across this one of yours. I think the 14th Ward building is definitely one that Robert and Margaret would have attended. But I am not sure about the Brighton Ward. According to the website it is circa 1900s. Robert and Margaret moved from Brighton in 1894. Does the 11th Ward building look like it was partly drawn in free hand? It does to me. N Dec 11, 2011 Thank you for your interest. Emerald Isle was recently sold and I had not updated its status on our website. I apologize. If you were interested because of its early Mormon connection, I do have a drawing of The Monarch of the Sea, another ship that transported Mormon immigrants from England, drawn by her captain John A. Burgess, ink on paper, 26 x 40 inches. A photo will follow. Please don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or further needs. Regards, Brett Levitre ANTHONY'S Fine Art | Antiques Here are some more photos of the Suspension Bridge not taken in 1868 and one painting not done in 1868, but they show some more details of the bridge.



Here are some more photos of the Suspension Bridge not taken in 1868 and one painting not done in 1868, but they show some more details of the bridge.



Hi everyone, Attached is a photo taken in 1868 of the railroad Suspension Bridge at Niagara Falls. Robert, Margaret and Alfred stopped at Niagara Falls and crossed the Suspension Bridge on their way to Utah in August of 1868. Trains crossed on the top deck of the bridge and pedestrians and carriages could cross on the deck underneath. This was probably the closest thing Robert and Margaret had to a honeymoon. It certainly wasn’t crossing the Atlantic Ocean on a crowded ship with a sadistic crew and disease and death stalking them the whole way. Okay, maybe I am overstating things . . . But then again, maybe not.



Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping that refers to John W. Young and William Snow.  Robert Gardiner worked under both men.  Also, last night I was reading Robert Gardiner, Utah Pioneer of 1868 and I saw some errors or misleading statements.  For example, Clarence refers to Captain Gillespie’s ox powered wagon train and to the Emerald Isle being lost at sea after leaving New York.  However, Robert, Margaret and Alfred Gardiner were in Captain Mumford’s mule powered wagon train.  (Most of the Scandinavian passengers on the Emerald Isle traveled in Captain Gillespie’s ox powered wagon train and most of the English speaking passengers on the Emerald Isle traveled in Captain Mumford’s mule powered wagon train.)  And the Emerald Isle did not sink after leaving New York.  N

Hi everyone,  I just realized that my email below included an error.  Captain Holman was the captain of the ox powered wagon train, not Gillespie.  Gillespie was the captain of the Emerald Isle.  I was just going by what was in Robert Gardiner, Utah Pioneer of 1868.  Another error.  N

Hi everyone,  When Robert, Margaret and Alfred Gardiner arrived in Utah they stopped at the North Fork of Echo Canyon where Robert went to work for John W. Young.  The North Fork of Echo Canyon is at the head of Echo Canyon.  John W. Young had a contract to fill and cut part of the railroad grade in the North Fork of Echo Canyon.  Robert, Margaret and Alfred lived in a dugout in the side of the canyon.  I don’t know the exact date when John W. Young completed his contract work, but as can be seen from the attached clipping it was estimated that he would be done by November 15, 1868.  That is consistent with Margaret and Alfred arriving in Salt Lake City the latter part of November 1868.

Once the contract in the North Fork of Echo Canyon was complete, John W. Young and his men moved to another contract about four miles south of Ogden near the mouth of Weber Canyon.  This raises some questions for me and I am looking for some help.  Why didn’t Robert travel with Margaret and Alfred to Salt Lake City?  Was it because Robert moved on to the next contract near the mouth of Weber Canyon and Margaret and Alfred didn’t want to follow him to Ogden?  (There was no reason for Margaret and Alfred to remain in the dugout at the head of Echo Canyon.)  Did Robert join Margaret and Alfred in Salt Lake City a day or two after they arrived in Salt Lake City or was it two or three months later when the contract work near the mouth of the Weber Canyon was finished?  I think it was Eva, Robert’s daughter, that wrote Robert worked on the railroad between Echo Canyon and Ogden.  Was that  just a reference to the railroad in general or is more meant by it?  If Robert just worked at one spot at the head of Echo Canyon, why the more general reference?

A review of all the histories probably would be helpful.  I admit I haven’t done it.  N

Hi everyone,  Attached is a list of names that include Robert, Margaret and Alfred Gardiner.  They didn’t enter Salt Lake City with the Mumford train, but stopped in Echo canyon so Robert could work on the railroad.  N

Deseret Evening News September 19, 1868:

 Hi everyone,  Attached is a copy of Robert Gardiner’s death certificate.  The informant was Clarence Gardiner and it raises a couple of questions:

1)      When was Robert Gardiner born?  The death certificate says October 24, 1845.  That is consistent with family records.  However, the earliest records, the Aberdeen Branch records, give Robert’s birth date as October 22, 1845.  Do we put down Robert’s birth date as October 24, 1845 with a footnote that the Aberdeen Branch records indicate it as being October 22, 1845?  Or do we put down Robert’s birth date as October 22, 1845 with a footnote that family records indicate it as being October 24, 1845?  It wouldn’t be the first time the family records were wrong.  Ralph Gardiner believed his birth date to be the year prior than what his birth certificate stated and on a different day which was the day he celebrated his birthday every year.

2)      Where was Robert Gardiner born?  It wasn’t Inverness.  Clarence corrects himself about 30 years later in his history of Robert.  I don’t know why he put Inverness down.  Family records and church records both give Robert’s birth place as Dundee.  However, one Scotland census lists his birth place as Liff.  Liff is more precise than Dundee.  I suppose that saying Robert was born in Dundee is like saying someone was born in Salt Lake City, Utah rather than Sandy, Utah.  It is all part of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area.  Do we put down Robert’s birth place as Dundee with a footnote that one census lists his birthplace as Liff?  Or do we put down Robert’s birth place as Liff with a footnote that church and family records (not death records) give his birth place as Dundee?  (Unless we get more information such as the address where Robert was born, I vote that we put down Dundee with a footnote about the census.)


Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping that advertises the sale of a restaurant and bakery (second from right column under “Business Change”.)  I wonder if it is for Robert Gardiner’s restaurant and bakery.

What we know – The first mention of the Deseret Bakery or Robert’s restaurant that I have seen is an advertisement in December 1877.  The last mention of the Deseret Bakery or Robert’s restaurant that I have seen is an advertisement on July 9, 1882.  Robert did not own the two story building in which the Deseret Bakery was located.  The building was owned by a Mr. Hopwood and was immediately north of Asmussen’s jewelry store.  The address of the Deseret Bakery and Robert’s restaurant was 58 S. Main in Salt Lake City.  On April 29, 1883, a millinery business advertises as being at 58 Main.  Sometime between July 9, 1882 and April 29, 1883, Robert Gardiner closed his bakery and restaurant.

The “for sale” ad – The ad is for a two story bakery and restaurant.  The location is being leased.  That is consistent with Robert’s bakery and restaurant.  The first “for sale” ad appeared in May 1882 and the last in October 1882. The last ad for Robert’s restaurant and bakery appeared during this time (between May and October 1882.)

Is the “for sale” ad for Robert’s bakery and restaurant?  Without an address, owner name or more information, it can’t be determined for sure, but the time is right.  If it is, what is the bad health referred to in the ad?  Is that just another way of saying Robert was tired of the stress and hassle of running a bakery and restaurant?  Something else?  It does raise the question, why did Robert close what apparently was a profitable business?  N

Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping that refers to Robert Gardiner.  Note that Robert did not own the building where the Deseret Bakery was located (likely a lease).  N

August 6, 1882, Salt Lake Daily Herald



Hi everyone,  Attached are copies of copies of a picture of Robert and Margaret Gardiner.  The picture was taken by C. R. Savage, Art Bazaar.  Prior to 1875, Savage’s business was known as the Pioneer Art Gallery.  In 1875, his business name was changed to the Art Bazaar.  In 1883, the Art Bazaar burned down, but was rebuilt.  C. R. Savage died in 1909.  So the picture of Robert and Margaret was taken some time between 1875 and             1909.  I also have a baby picture of Frederick Gardiner taken in late 1879 or early 1880 by C.R. Savage, Art Bazaar.  Since we know that Robert and Margaret had a picture taken by Savage in 1879/80 of Frederick, my guess is that is when they had their picture taken as well.  It wouldn’t surprise me if they had a picture taken of their other living children, Margaret Amelia Gardiner (about 8 years old) and William Francis Gardiner (about  3 years old) at the same time.   Do any of you know of such a photo of Margaret A. or William F.?  Just some ideas.  N

If the picture was taken between 1875 and 1883, maybe it was taken the same time as Frederick Gardiner's baby picture was taken.  I wonder if it was taken at the Art Bazaar as well.  Aunt Gloria or Aunt Mary, do either of you have the original of Frederick Gardiner's baby picture?  N

Savage's negatives burned in 1883.  The Art Bazaar was around from 1875 to 1883.  So that is the date range when the photo would have been taken.  


Hi everyone,  Attached is a clean photo and a marked up photo that may show Robert Gardiner’s candy factory.  It is the closest thing that I can find right now.  N





Hi everyone,  Attached are some photos of Martin’s alley.  The first one was probably taken in the late 1800’s.  The second one shows the alley in the bottom right-hand corner.  The third one shows Teasdel’s Store and the alley.  The last one shows my estimate of where the alley would have been, if the buildings weren’t blocking the view (red line).  Robert Gardiner’s candy factory was south of Martin’s alley.  So it would not be in the photo.  (If only the photographer had turned more to his left.)  Also, the factory would have been east of Dinwoodey’s warehouse and west of the big brick building at the top of the photo (between the green lines).  N






Hi everyone,  In 1874 Robert Gardiner purchased some land behind Teasdel’s store in Salt Lake City from Edward Martin.  Yes. This is the same Edward Martin associated with the ill-fated handcart company.  Edward Martin owned a photograph business immediately north of Teasdel’s store, and apparently some land behind Teasdel’s store as well.  I have attached a photo of Martin’s photograph business.  The building to the left of Martin’s business in the picture became Teasdel’s store.

To the right of Martin’s business is an alley.  Robert Gardiner would have used this alley to get to his property and candy factory behind Teasdel’s store.  I have also attached an advertisement for Robert Gardiner’s Deseret Bakery.  Notice at the bottom of the advertisement it says “Candy Factory, Martin’s Avenue”.  I don’t think there ever was a Martin’s Avenue in Salt Lake City, but it does sound better than “Martin’s Alley.”   N



Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping (starting in first column) of a rather sensational murder that occurred in Robert Gardiner’s neighborhood in 1897.  Mr. Hamilton was killed in the front of the house at 229 West First South.  Aiken’s Court was behind the house at 229 West.  Jesse W. Fox and George R. Taylor (Ward Teachers?) heard the shots while they were visiting the Robert Gardiner home.  N






Hi everyone,  Well, this clipping may ruin your appetite.  Look in second column under “Wonderful”.  It talks about one of the Gardiner neighbors living at 118 South First West in 1896.  N

June 13, 1897 Salt Lake Herald: 





Hi everyone,  After Robert Gardiner was foreclosed on and lost everything, Robert and his family moved from Brighton to an apartment/house that they rented on Aiken Court in Salt Lake City (approximately 221 West 118 South).  I am not aware of any photos of the building where they lived, but attached are some photos of the neighborhood.  Fremont school was on the same block and southwest of Aiken Court.  St. Mary’s academy was on the same block and southeast of Aiken Court.  N








58 So Main:

Hi, Early SLC photos are difficult to date?  Here is a hint:  notice the horse drawn trolley and read below.
Note: The years the horse drawn trolley ran on main were the very years Robert did business there.  This may be the best photo of Deseret Bakery we have. Kent

Excerpt from Salt Lake Tribune
Trolley Song: Clang, Clang, Whinny
Hal Schindler
Published:
08/13/1995

It was the first week of June 1872 when the vanguard of the city's new street cars actually was fitted on the track down Main Street "for the purpose of having the curves spiked in their proper places." The track was nearly complete to the Eagle Emporium on 1st South and workmen were busy along East Temple [Main], preparing the road for ties.

The "clang, clang, clang," of course, would be the trolley bell, warning of its approach. And the "whinny?" That refers to its method of locomotion. The city's trolleys in '72 were horse-drawn and remained that way until the late 1880s when they went electric. It was in 1891 that the Eagle Gate was rebuilt for a greater height and width to accommodate trolley cars. Yes, to the history buff, the trivia divulged by newspapers of the period is absolutely delightful in its variety.





Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping that refers to Charles Stewart Gardiner.

Also, a comment about where Robert Gardiner lived in Salt Lake:  From at least 1871 (and probably earlier) until 1884, Robert owned a home on R Street and 2nd Avenue.  The Brighton Ward records show Robert and his family moving into the Brighton Ward in 1884.  During this time (1876) Robert filed on some land in Brighton which required him to establish residence there.  As early as January 1876, he commenced to clear the land in Brighton and he claims to have established his residence in Brighton on 1 March 1876.  In August of 1876, William Francis Gardiner was born in Brighton.  However, it doesn’t appear that they remained in Brighton very long since their Church records were in the 20th Ward in 1877.

In 1879 Frederick Gardiner was born and in 1881 Clarence LeRoy Gardiner was born.  According to Clarence LeRoy Gardiner, Frederick Gardiner and Clarence Gardiner were born at “a home immediately back of where the Kearns Building now stands on Main Street, between 1st and 2nd South” in Salt Lake City, Utah.  I wonder about that.  Robert did own some land between 1st and 2nd South where his candy factory was located.  However, he also owned his home on R Street in 1879 and 1881 when Frederick and Clarence were born.  The R Street home was sold in 1884.  And in 1884 Robert and his family moved to Brighton as substantiated by the Brighton Ward Records.  Clarence would have been about 3 at that time and it is impossible to know what memories Clarence had of their home on R Street.  It is possible that Frederick and Clarence were born at the candy factory or a building next to the candy factory, but Clarence refers to a home not a candy factory.  Will see what more I can find . . . N

February 9, 1893 Salt Lake Herald:



Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping that refers to Robert Gardiner.  Look under Criminal Settings.  Robert was charged with cruelty to animals.  Robert was alleged to have not fed or watered a horse for 14 hours.  (I fast longer than that.)  At trial Robert was found guilty of not feeding or watering a horse for 9 hours.  He appealed and eventually the case was dismissed.  My guess is that the prosecutor didn’t think it was worth his time to pursue the appeal (more important  cases to pursue).  N

October 2, 1895 Salt Lake Herald:



Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping that refers to Smith v. Gardiner.  Between 1888 and 1890 Robert Gardiner invested in several railroad companies that never were successful.  That ultimately led to Robert losing his home and other property.  N

Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping that refers to Robert Gardiner.  Based upon the clippings that I have found it appears that Robert Gardiner played checkers in at least 1881, 1910, 1914-1917, 1919-1920.  Also, based upon the Salt Lake City directories, it appears Robert worked as a candy maker or confectioner in at least 1874, 1878-1881, 1883-1886, 1889, 1894-1895, 1897-1900.  I will try to have more detail for the reunion.  N


Hi everyone,  Attached is a clipping that refers to a Mr. Gardner.  Look under “How the Old Man Assisted a Thompson Celebration.”  At first I thought the Mr. Gardner was Robert Gardiner.  But after looking closer at the street names, I now believe the clipping is referring to Alfred Gardiner.  I don’t know why he is referred to as an “old man,” since Alfred would have been about 42.  However, Alfred lived about a block away from J Street and Robert was living near 2nd West at this time.  (Brigham Street is South Temple.)  N

December 6, 1902 Deseret Evening News:



I do have more info, but it is at home.  The Robert Gardner who robbed the Hansen home was younger than our Robert Gardiner.  If I remember, I might have seen his mug shot in the State Archives.  It is amazing how many people have the same names.  A lot of errors are done in genealogy work because of that.  N

Cathy has the originals of the molds. My parents have the machines. All of us have cast aluminum copies of the molds as well. I have a wood candy bucket that was decrated into unrecognizability (ok it's not a real word) by a friend of my grandmother, Leone Layton. I also have a reproduction pan for cooking and pouring candy. We have never used the machines, although I have seen similar machines in use, but I make hundreds of clear toy candies every winter.

Thanks for keeping me in mind.  Chris and Cathy are descendants of Margaret Amelia Gardiner Gedge.  I think Chris is in the Relief Society magazine picture.  Cathy I believe is a cousin to Chris.  N

Hi, I'd like to make sure I have all the histories on Robert and Margaret.  This is what I have.  Are there any other histories available? Thank heaven Clarence has the foresight to write these histories.  We would be totally lost without them.  Kent

1.  Clarence on Margaret Stewart Gardiner, Utah Pioneer of 1868 with notes on Margaret by Eva Winifred Gardiner Cushing and notes added by Dawn G. James, history written in 1957

2.  Beatrice Lenore Gardiner Low on Margaret Stewart Gardiner, notes by Dawn G. James

3.  Clarence on Robert Gardiner, Utah Pioneer of 1868, notes from the record of Eva W. Gardiner Cushing from memory of her mother

4.  Hans Jensen Hals on the Emerald Isle trip, a daily log


January 22, 1909


Thanks!  Attached is a clipping that refers to R. E. Gardner, R. J. Bryant and James McDonald.  This was one of the clippings that helped me conclude that the Robert Gardiner referred to with the mine death was not our Robert Gardiner.  N

December 4, 1910 Salt Lake Herald: 

February 1, 2011 Dear Kent, You are confused because it is confusing. The DN began publication on June 15, 1850 as a weekly newspaper. A semi-weekly edition was added on October 8, 1865. On November 21, 1867 a daily edition was added under the name Deseret Evening News. From 1867 to 1889 the Deseret News published the daily Deseret Evening News, the semiweekly Deseret News and the Deseret News Weekly. My source for this is Holley, Robert P., ed. Utah's Newspapers -- Traces of Her Past. Marriott Library, University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT 1984. pp. 13, 14. I checked. I also do not have the January 12, 1881 hard copy. It is possible that Brigham Young University might have it. Best, Luise



November 23, 2010
Robert's confectionary/bakery business was behind or inside the Teasdel Building.  That building was built in 1874 and lasted until 1904/5 when they made plans to put in the Kearns Building. (1909)  The Kearns Building is there today.

Interestingly enough, when I visited with Donald Gardiner in the 1970s, he was selling newspapers, confections and the like in the lobby of the Kearns Building.  He sold candy in the same spot his uncle did a hundred years before.

Enclosed you will find pictures of the Teasdel Building, the spot Robert had his business. Kent




Sorry to be so long replying. I wanted to say "of course," but waited until I had a chance to ask my parents. I was right. Rachel was active. Why do you ask?  Chris
Oh, and I think I left something off the candy molds list. Did I include a teapot? There are at least three molds on Nancy Fasolt's site that are identical to molds Robert had--one of the deer, one of the dogs, and rabbits. I wll get you the numbers if you're interested.


Oops. Thanks for the reminder. I have attached a picture of the molds in the original "set." I haven't yet talked with Nancy Fasolt about making sets. I will send her this picture tomorrow night when I have time. I have individual photos that are a bit better to see, but they overloaded the email. I'll try sending them in several messages tomorrow. The address for the site is http://cleartoycandymoulds.com/ and the numbers below are the only ones she has for sale now, but I know she has some of the other molds because they are pictured in her book, so she can get copies made. We have talked with her about doing it, but not in specifics. You can get a guess at the prices from the molds on the site.
Oh, by the way, I have family asking about the picture book. Is it a finished book or just a cover?



For information on candy moulds: http://cleartoycandymoulds.com/index.html