Monday, October 26, 2009

Ann Gall 1817 - 1886


Photobucket Ann Gall, born 20 Jan 1817, Stonehaven or Fetteresso, Kincardine, Scotland  Stonehaven which is a half hour south of Aberdeen.  It is a quaint seaside town with a small harbor and lots of charm.

The Fetteresso area of Stonehaven is located N of the train station and today it is on the north of the freeway.  It still has some of the small houses that were probably homes a hundred years ago.  The area also has the remains of a church and a cemetery.  The Stonehaven Castle is within walking distance but has been turned into flats.

Her parents are James M Gall who was born 1792 and Jennie Sadler, (from death certificate)

Her grandparents on her father's side are John Gall and Elspet Massie.  In the records Massie is spelled Mafsie.  The "f" is included to let readers know the  "s" is repeated.  John and Elspet were married 28 November 1780 in Turriff.  GS Film number: 993303 They had two boys, William and James.  William was born 28 Sep 1787 in Turriff, Aberdeen, Scotland.  GS Film number: 993304 James was born 18 December 1792 in Turriff.
GS Film number: 993304.

Turriff (from Scottish Gaelic Torraibh, meaning "place of round hills") is a town and civil parish in Aberdeenshire in Scotland. It lies on the River Deveron, about 166 feet (51 m) above sea level, and has a population of 5,708.[2] In everyday speech it is often referred to by its Scots name, Turra.

James married Jennie Sadler and are found living in Stonehaven in 1817 when Ann Gall was born.  Stonehaven is an hour by car south of Turriff. 
 
Ann married James Gardiner, tinsmith 02 Feb 1838  Aberdeen,, Grampian, Scotland
and had 11 children.  They moved between Aberdeen and Dundee on 8 Mar 1863, Ann was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.  This occurred on 8 Mar 1863 and was performed by Jno. McBeath, and confirmed 9 Mar 1863 by Jno. Mcbeath.  She was removed to Dundee 1866  (Aberdeen Branch Record, FHL104149).

Ann liked using snuff which was in style during this time period.  Her snuff box was passed down through her son Ralph's descendants. 

After some of their children immigrated  they followed suit.  First to the USA and later to Canada.

Upon seeing Salt Lake City Ann was reported to have said, “We came here expecting to see the gilded towers of Zion, but found only mud dykes.” Disaffected with the church, they went to St. Catherines, Canada but unfortunately James died at 70 leaving Ann to live another ten years, dying in Minneapolis, Minnesota at 68. They had 10 children

Hi everyone,  Attached is a copy of two pages from the 1885 Minnesota census.  As you can see Ann Gardiner was living in Minneapolis with the John Stevenson family (two doors down from her daughter, Matilda Gardiner Gunn, and family).  My guess is that the Stevensons had an extra room to rent.

The 1884-85 Minneapolis city directory does not list Ann Gardiner or John Gunn, Matilda Gardiner Gunn’s husband.  But it does list John Stevenson, boiler maker, as living at 2700 S. 28th

According to the 1885-86 Minneapolis city directory, “Annie Gardiner” was living at 2704 E. 28th and John Gunn, boiler maker, and family were living at 33 Boston Pl, about three lots away from Ann Gardiner (less than 1/2 block).  John Stevenson, boiler maker, is no longer listed as living near Ann Gardiner or John Gunn.


Early drawings of Stonehaven:















According to the 1886-87 Minneapolis city directory, Ann Gardiner is no longer listed.  She died in May 1886.  John Gunn, boiler maker, has moved to 3021 Fort Av. and Ralph Gardiner, bridge builder and diver and brother to Robert, Alfred, Frederick and Arthur Gardiner, is living at 36 Boston.  Based upon her death records, I believe Ann passed away at 36 Boston Av.  NG

1885-86 Minneapolis Directory:


















Hi everyone,  Attached is a copy of two pages from the 1885 Minnesota census.  As you can see Ann Gardiner was living in Minneapolis with the John Stevenson family (two doors down from her daughter, Matilda Gardiner Gunn, and family).  My guess is that the Stevensons had an extra room to rent.

The 1884-85 Minneapolis city directory does not list Ann Gardiner or John Gunn, Matilda Gardiner Gunn’s husband.  But it does list John Stevenson, boiler maker, as living at 2700 S. 28th.

According to the 1885-86 Minneapolis city directory, “Annie Gardiner” was living at 2704 E. 28th and John Gunn, boiler maker, and family were living at 33 Boston Pl, about three lots away from Ann Gardiner (less than 1/2 block).  John Stevenson, boiler maker, is no longer listed as living near Ann Gardiner or John Gunn.

According to the 1886-87 Minneapolis city directory, Ann Gardiner is no longer listed.  She died in May 1886.  John Gunn, boiler maker, has moved to 3021 Fort Av. and Ralph Gardiner, bridge builder and diver and brother to Robert, Alfred, Frederick and Arthur Gardiner, is living at 36 Boston.  Based upon her death records, I believe Ann passed away at 36 Boston Av.  N




 


Ann's Death Certificate:

 Ann Gall died on May 3, 1886 in Minneapolis from consumption at age 67.

Consumption is an old name for tuberculosis (TB) that describes how the illness wastes away or consumes its victims. TB is "an ancient enemy" that has plagued humankind for more than five thousand years. The Greeks called it phthisis, and Hippocrates advised his medical students against treating it, because it was almost always deadly, and a dead patient was bad for business.
Caused by a highly contagious bacterial infection, TB is blamed for 20% of the deaths in 17th-century London and 30% of those in 19th-century Paris (as depicted in Moulin Rouge). In those days, the disease proved deadly for about 80% of its victims. It's estimated that TB has killed over 1 billion people in the last two centuries.

The classic symptoms of active TB infection are a chronic cough with blood-tinged sputumfevernight sweats, and weight loss (the latter giving rise to the formerly prevalent term "consumption"). Infection of other organs causes a wide range of symptoms.

Death certificate:
Photobucket


Hi everyone,  I finally found Ann Gall Gardiner’s grave.  I had looked several years ago with no success.  Part of the problem was transcription errors.  If you go to the website for the Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery, you will find an “Anna Gardner” listed as being buried in that cemetery.  Since the Minneapolis death records give Ann Gardiner’s name as “Ann Gardner” it really wouldn’t be a surprise to find the burial record as also spelling her name as “Ann Gardner”.  However, years ago when I was looking I noticed that the website gives “Anna Gardner’s” death date as May 31, 1886 thereby eliminating her as being our Ann Gardiner.

Recently, I started searching for Ann Gardiner’s gravesite again.  This time when I looked at the website I noticed that although “Anna Gardner” was supposed to have died on May 31, 1886, the burial date was given as May 4, 1886.  Something had to be wrong.  Fortunately the cards transcribed for the website are on microfilm at the family history library in Salt Lake.  Upon checking the microfilm, it showed the death date for “Anna Gardner” as being May 3, 1886, the same death date as our Ann Gardiner.  This still wasn’t enough for me to connect our Ann Gardiner with “Anna Gardner.”  However, the burial record also gives the place of death, 2736 27 ½ St. S.

The 1886-87 directory for Minneapolis gives the address for Ralph Gardiner, Ann’s son, as 36 Boston Avenue.  Boston Avenue is described in the directory as “27 ½ st from 27 av S east.”  So another way of describing 36 Boston Avenue would be 2736 27 ½ St. S., the address of Ralph Gardiner.  For that reason I believe that “Anna Gardner” is a transcription error from the death record for “Ann Gardner”, who really is our Ann Gardiner.

The Minneapolis Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery, previously known as Layman’s Cemetery, is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  There was no headstone for Ann Gardiner.  But if the family decides to place a headstone in the cemetery it will need to “fit in” with the other markers.  Not a big deal, but it is an additional hoop that one would need to jump through.  

One more thing that I forgot to mention.  Another fact that supports Ann Gardiner being buried in the Layman’s Cemetery is its location.  Ann Gardiner lived near the railroad yard  in Minneapolis.  The Layman’s Cemetery (now Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery) was located almost directly opposite of where she lived on the other side of the railroad yard.N

One more thing that I forgot to mention.  Another fact that supports Ann Gardiner being buried in the Layman’s Cemetery is its location.  Ann Gardiner lived near the railroad yard  in Minneapolis.  The Layman’s Cemetery (now Pioneers and Soldiers Cemetery) was located almost directly opposite of where she lived on the other side of the railroad yard. N