Wednesday, April 15, 2015

The Stewarts of Clochfoldich, Perthshire, Scotland

The Stewarts lived in a picturesque area of the Scottish Highlands between the Rivers Tay and Tummell near the Strathtay village.

 On the high banks of the Tay, Little Clochfoldich is named as the birthplace of our Stewart family and later records show that William Steuart, their father was also born on Clochfoldich estate in 1780 at Clochfoldich,  to parents  James Steuart and Margaret Walker or Margaret Fergusson in 1777.  Further research needed.  
Christina Duncan (Stewart) b 1841, William Stewart's grandson's wife
William Stewart Family Research page 
William Stewart's (shoemaker)
father James Stewart and Margaret Fergusson
mother Margaret Walker
first wife Elizabeth Erskine 
daughter Jean Stewart 
Jean's husband James Crichton
daughter  Elizabeth (Betty) Stewart
daughter, Margaret Stewart m John Connolly
daughter, Janet Stewart, m Thomas Gray
son in law Robert Stewart
daughter Mary Stewart, no information
second wife Margaret Livingston 
son John Stewart, immigrated to Australia 
grandson Reverend James Steward of Brisbane
Pedigrees
gdaughter Margaret Stewart (Gardiner)

William Stewart had the following children:
1808              Jean Stewart was born, daughter of William Stewart [and Elizabeth Erskine] at [Clochfoldich], Logierait Parish (1851 census; and death record.  Margaret S. Gardiner said Jean was born about 1809; Salt Lake Temple record, FHL183462, p458, #15133).
3 Jan 1811         Elizabeth [Betty] Stewart was born at [Clochfoldich], Logierait Parish, daughter of William Stewart, shoemaker, [and Elizabeth Erskine] (1851 census of Kirkton, Kinclaven, Perth, and family record.  Margaret S. Gardiner said Elizabeth was born "abt 1812,"  Salt Lake Temple record, p177, #6247, FHL184090).
     1813             Mary Stewart was born "abt 1814."  (Margaret S. Gardiner, Salt Lake Temple record, p458, #15134, FHL183462).
     1813             "Mrs. William Stewart", grandmother of Margaret S. Gardiner, died "abt 1814" (Margaret S. Gardiner, Salt Lake Temple Record, FHL183416, p265, #9515).
(The following marriage entry convinced me that the "Abt" dates given by Margaret needed to be rolled back one year.  William's first wife, Elizabeth Erskine, obviously died before 1814.  Mary was born the same year her mother died and Jean and Betty gave their own census ages that indicate 1808 and 1811 birth years.)
   Dec 1813        William Stewart, shoemaker, Clochfoldich, and Margaret Livingstone, Stanley, Redgorton Parish, gave up their names for proclamation of marriage.
 2 Jan 1814        Granted marriage lines 2 January 1814 (Logierait Parish Register, FHL102757).
23 Dec 1814      Janet, Lawful Daughter to William Stewart, shoemaker, & Margaret Livingstone in Little Clochfoldich, was born Dec'r 23rd & bap 26th 1814 (Logierait Parish Register, p105, FHL102756).
 8 Feb 1819       Margaret, Lawful Daughter to William Stewart, shoemaker, & Margaret Livingstone in Little Clochfoldich, was born February 8th & baptized 9th 1819 (Logierait Parish Register, p153, FHL102756).
 1 Feb 1822       John, Lawful Son to William Stewart, Shoemaker, & Margaret Livingstone in Little Clochfoldich, was born February 1st and baptized 6th 1822 (Logierait Parish Register, p181, FHL102757).
11 Jan 1834       Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of William Stewart, shoemaker, and Elizabeth Erskine, married Robert Stewart, son of Robert and Amelia R. Stewart. (see page 8).
11 Nov 1836     Jean Stewart, daughter of William Stewart, shoemaker, married James Crichton in Scone Parish (see page 5).

In 1817 an extensive census of Stewarts of the Athol area revealed that William Stewart and his three daughters, his father, James Stewart with two sons and four daughters, and William’s sister Isobell lived at Little Clochfoldich.   One of the grandchildren of William Stewart, John Stewart was also born there in 1836.   The heiress of the estate of Clochfoldich since 1833,  Janet (Jessie)  Wilhemina Maxwell Stewart married William Bowie Campbell in Logierait on 5/4/1838 and later the estate was sold to the Robertson family. 

David Stewart of Garth, 1817 census
  

At some point in the late 1830’s  William Stewart, a widower,  moved to Scone, Perthshire and was still working as a shoemaker in the 1841 census.  He had a son named Robert Stewart who married Elizabeth Stewart.  Their names were the same though not related directly.

Janet (Jessie), Margaret and her husband John Connolly and John Stewart departed Dundee in Scotland to emigrate to Australia on the ‘Anne Milne’,  in  September 1841 and landed in Sydney cove on 17th January 1842.   Margaret Stewart must have married shortly before the voyage as she was living with her father William and infant niece Elisabeth in the 1841 census. 

John Connolly was a wheelwright,  from Kings County (Offaly) in Ireland.   William Stewart was listed as a parent as a parent and Margaret Livingstone, mother of the ‘Anne Milne’ trio, was listed as a deceased parent on the ship records.  Unknown to the Australian family at the time, their step-sister Elisabeth and husband Robert Stewart and family members may have watched their boat depart Scotland’s shoreline. 


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This video is about 2015 Clochfoldich

Who are William's parents:
Sandra, We could use some more information on the problems of who are William’s parents.  I don’t see a great deal of difference
in the two choices.  They both are on the estate.  They both have a William Stewart or Steuart.  The names are often used interchangably.  And if the 1841 census rounds down, they are still both candidates. I can’t find a Wister Clochfolich on the map.  But I did find a  Wister Toberandonich adjoining the estate.

William was born to either Margaret Walker or Margaret Fergusson. 
William lived at Little Clockfoldich from 1808 to 1822. 
Wisler, Colchfoldich and Balendune, Clockfoldich are both on the estate and somewhat near the main house.

The 1841 census was taken on the 6th of June 1841. 

If William was born on July 22, 1777 he would be 63 years 10 months and 15 days in the 1841 census.  If William was born July 25, 1780 he would be 60 years 10 months and 12 days in the 1841 census.

1777 Feb 23     James Steuart in Clochfoldich in this parish and Margaret Walker inhabit in Dull Parish enter their names year.
1777 Feb 22     James Stewart in the Parish of Logieraite and Margaret Walker in this Parish (Dull) gave up their names to be proclaimed in order to marriage
1777 July 22  William LS (legitimate son) to James Steuart and Marg. Fergufson in Wister Clochfolich baptised
1780 July 25 William LS to James and Margaret Walker in Balendune Clochfoldich.

13 Feb 1808     Will'm Stewart, Logierait, and Isabel Erskine in this parish gave up their names to be proclaimed
            William Stewart Shoemaker in Little Clochfolich and elizabeth Erskine in Derculich Dull Parish gave up
            their names for proclamation of banns in order to marriage _ granted marriage lines the 28 current
1808 or 9         Jean Stewart was born, daughter of William Stewart [and Elizabeth Erskine] at [Clochfoldich]
3 Jan 1811       Elizabeth [Betty] Stewart was born at [Clochfoldich]
1813                 Mary Stewart was born "abt 1814.”

Dec 1813       William Stewart, shoemaker, Clochfoldich, and Margaret Livingstone married
23 Dec 1814    Janet, Lawful Daughter to William Stewart, shoemaker, & Margaret Livingstone in Little Clochfoldich
8 Feb 1819      Margaret, Lawful Daughter to William Stewart, shoemaker, & Margaret Livingstone in Little Clochfoldich
1 Feb 1822      John, Lawful Son to William Stewart, Shoemaker, & Margaret Livingstone in Little Clochfoldich,
1841 Census, New Mill, Scone, William Stewart 60 Shoe Maker, Margaret Stewart 20, Elizabeth Stewart 1
Abt 1851         William Stewart, shoemaker, died at Kinclaven






Historical Backdrop of Athol Stewarts

The history of the Clochfoldich Estate is that it was the original Seat of Alexander Stewart,  Esquire of Clochfoldich, grandfather of Janet Stewart,  and Seats of estates of Killiechassie, Blackhill, and Derculich, are all descendants of Mr Robert Stewart, Minister of Killin, commonly called Curan an tsaghail, of the House of Cluny and Atholl.  Whilst  our Stewarts listed their religion as  Roman Catholics in the Ann Milne ship records,  it is unknown if they had any association with these Stewarts of Clochfoldich  listed in the Scottish Catholic church archives.   Since the 1745 Battle of Culloden massacre, the Catholic religion was not openly practised  in Perthshire until the 19th century when there was a influx of Irish immigrants.  It may have been an act of defiance that the Stewarts listed their religion as Catholics on the ship’s records as they never practised Catholism in Australia.   The Catholic Stewarts were in danger of being murdered after Culloden for supporting Bonnie Prince Charlie’s bid for the return of a Stewart king to the throne.   The main estate house of Clochfoldich  was firstly the hereditary estate of  Alexander Stewart 1st of Clochfoldich and Margaret Stewart of the Urrard Stewart family and secondly of their son, Robert  2nd of Clochfoldich  and Susan Fleming from Dull,  and thirdly Alexander Stewart 3rd of Clochfoldich and Wilhemina Maxwell.  Their daughter Janet Stewart became the heiress of the estate.   Robert and Susan Stewart had a son James but he was born on 1/12/1762 which made him too young to be the father of our William Stewart b. 1777.  

There was certainly no immediate connection to the Minister of Killin, Robert Stewart b. 1650 but there is a remote possibility that our ‘Steuarts’ living on one of his estates and also having a trade as a shoemaker and son, a carpenter were supported in some way as trades were very expensive in that era as mostly children grew up to be agricultural labourers or  factory workers.   The Minister of Killin  was the fifth son and 8th of 9 children born to  James Stewart,   1st of Wester Cluny put him well out of contention of an inherited estate which was the birthright of his eldest brother Alexander 2nd of Wester Cluny.   His other elder brothers John b. 1643, James,  b. 1647 and William, b. 1648 do not appear to have estates either.  However,  the Minister of Killin,  did procure estates for each of his four sons, James, b.1683 (Killichasie),  Duncan ,  b. 1688 (Blackhill),  Alexander,  b. 1689 (Clochfoldich) and Robert,  b. 1704 (Derculich).   All estates were upstream of Clochfoldich estate.  The funding of these estates was an area of great contention with the Catholic church, the history of which is on public record.  

The Royal connection with the Minister of Killin’s family is through the King Robert II’s brother Alexander, the Wolf of Badendoch or Earl of Buchan.    The Minister of Killin   was the son of James 1st  of Wester Cluny was the son of Alexander 5th of Bonskeid who was the son of John Stewart 4th of Bonskeid who was the son of James Stewart 3rd of Bonskeid who was the son of Alexander Stewart 1st of Bonskeid, who was the son of John Gorm Stewart of Fortingall, who was the son of James Stewart of Fortingall and Garth, who was the second son of Alexander Stewart b. 1343, the Wolf of Badenoch and 1st Earl of Buchan.  The ruins of the Castle of Garth are near Killichasie upstream on the Tay River from Clochfoldich.   Also at Killichasie there is a tree under which it is reported that Bonnie Prince Charlie spent the night.   Also at the entrance to Killichasie there is a famous tree, a sycamore which is known to be the first to bud in the United Kingdom, even before the Cornwall sycamores which is highly unusual.  
This clan of Atholl Stewarts was distinct from the Appin Stewarts who also had highland Royal connections to the English Stuarts and were related to John of Bonkyll, the grand uncle of King Robert 2, and brother of his  grandfather,  James Stewart. There is more than a rumour in our family history that our  Stewarts are Appin Stewarts but there does not appear to be any proof  for this in the history given by family members in the 1817 census as they associated as  being  ‘old Athol family’ of  Stewarts.  The only substantiation for this would be related to the Earl of Athol, son of Black Lord of Lorn, James Stewart who married King Robert’s widow Jean Beaufort, and was the son of John of Bonkyll.  A great historian, writer and journalist  James Irvine Robertson  was asked  by a member of our Stewart family the question of the ‘old Atholl’ roots and he replied that it is possible these Stewarts relate from the Earl of Athol.   He also replied that regardless of that connection, any Stewarts living in Perthshire are related as younger sons of younger sons of  the Wolf of Badendoch.  The whole River Tay area has evidence of ancient  Kings  as not far away, downsteam of the Tay, is the mythical setting of Macbeth.   There is one remaining old oak at Dunkeld which is supposed to be the last of the forest of Birnam Woods.    Banquo was supposedly a Stewart whose descendants ascended the throne.  


Tracing the Scottish history of the Stewarts was simplified by the discovery of a Stewart census of 1817 published on the internet:  List of Stewarts of Atholl and their descendants collected by David Stewart of Garth in 1817[1].   This list aimed to identify the ancestral branch of each Stewart household and covered the area of our Stewarts.    http://www.jamesirvinerobertson.co.uk/AthollStewartCensus.pdf

In Clochfoldich, William, James and Isabell Stewart were identified as being from an Old Athol family.  Isabell Stewart is possibly the sister of William Stewart  and another possibility to be explored is that James Stewart is William’s father.   Two further Stewart households in 1817 in Clochfoldich were John Stewart of the Bonkseid family and Elizabeth; Jean Stewart of the Foss House Family of Stewarts.  It was quite usual in those times to have a daughter or son working in a relative’s home as a servant so there is often a variety of different family groups under the one roof.  In the census, the children were not recorded except for the number of sons and daughter of each household.  William’s household record for Clochfoldich listed 3 daughters.  James household record listed 2 sons and 4 daughters with a notation about one son and daughter which could mean that they are married or have left the area. 
 

Original parish records reveal that William Stewart, father of John Stewart of Bald Hills married at least twice.  But firstly to identify William Stewart, shoemaker of Clochfoldich, Scotland’s people – parish records were consulted.  From the census of 1840 in Scone where William had moved, his age was rounded to 60 which means his birth year was approximately 1780.  There were two choices: 

1. William  born 23 July, 1780 to James Stewart and Margaret Walker  in Balendune, Clochfoldich, (just north of the main house) This date is closer to the 1841 census where William is noted as being 60 years old.) or
2. William b. 20 July 1777 and baptised 22/7/1777  to James Steuart and Margaret Fergusson in Wester Clochfoldich. (Just west of the main house.)  


 1877 Marriage of James Stewart and Margaret Walker


 


1880 Logierait Parish, Scotland





After, a visit to Cloichfoldich and visiting  Little Cloichfoldich which is also known as Upper Cloichfoldich, it is apparent that Balinduin or Balendune is not the same place but another house on the Cloichfoldich estate.  This rules out William No. 1 as other parish marriage records  definitely describe William as living at Little Clochfoldich.     Also William and Margaret Fergusson married at Blair Atholl which also associates them as an old Athol family rather than at Derculich and Logierait where William and Margaret Walker married.  It may of course have been because Margaret Fergusson lived at Kincraigie near Blair Atholl. 


The marriage in Blair Athol is:
           
            James Steuart of Wester Clochfoldich, Logierait Parish and Margaret Ferguson of Kincraigie married on 26/8/1776.  (Kincraigie is outide Blair Athol)

Other recorded siblings, consistent with living at Wester Clochfoldich are:

            William  Steuart  b. 20/7/1777   (our ancestor)
            Isobel Steuart  bap. 26/4/1779
            Grizel Steuart bap.  31/5/1781
            John Steuart  bap.      8/2/1784

No research has been undertaken to know if the following are siblings or parents of James Stewart:
            Robert Stewart of Killychassie
            Donald of Drumcharie
            Ann of Killichragie



 

Stewart,  b. 1778 to  Donald and Janet Scott.  I can find no evidence in the parish records to support these alternative parents of William.  If Alexander or Donald were his parents then this name would have been used in the descendants and I cannot see evidence of this as a major name sequence. One of the younger  sons of John and Jean Stewart was named Alexander after Alexander Caldwell (the minister at the Bald Hills Presbyterian church).  Also John Stewart’s sister Janet and Thomas Gray had an Alexander as a 6th of 7 children.    In Rev. James Stewart’s eulogy for his father, John Stewart,  his birthplace is Strathtay (close to Clochfoldich).   The parish of Logierait is the nearest registration for Births, Marriages and Deaths in this district.  There are quite a few buildings in Upper Clochfoldich, Clochfoldich and the Laigh of Clochfoldich, Cloch Cottage and Red Gate Cottage.   When Jessie or Jane Stewart, daughter of John Stewart married Samuel Latham, their farm at Murgon was named Red Gate. Whether there was a family connection with Red Gate cottage/farm  at Clochfoldich is unknown.

Robert Stewart, husband of  William’s daughter Elizabeth b. 1809  identifies as being born at EdraDynate so could be one of these estate families.   Still in the search for William’s ancesters a search from Scotland’s people from 1770 until 1820  for  Ste?art  births of James Ste?art and Margaret  revealed:

 
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Possible births of Margaret Fergusson who lived at Kincraigie  near Blair Atholl at the time of her marriage are:

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Or if she was from Logierait



 
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Out of these three choices,  the Blair Atholl  is more likely as she stated she was from Kincraigie at her marriage and the 1751 Margaret would be 25 at marriage which is more likely. 

James has the possibility of being the son of John Steuart and Ann McLagen of Easter Auchnagie bap. 13/1/1755.   He would be 21 at the marriage and his wife would be older in both of the cases above  Another child born to this couple spelt their name Steuart.   Really we are into speculation here so it is not worth pursuing this back any further.



















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Of these entries it seems that William’s sister,  Isobell or Bell remained at Clochfoldich and possibly William’s daughters  Mary Stewart was a servant at Killichassie house as she would be 28 at this time and ages were rounded down to 25.  The fact that she has an independent income may indicate that the family was quite well off at one point.     

Another possibility is that John Stewart of Cloch Cottage may have apprenticed our Australian John Stewart  as he is a Wright and there are two possibilities for our John Stewart, the first is a Wright living in Perth and the second is a Joiner living in Glasgow.     The Robertson family are obviously the new owners of the estate.  The other interesting entry is for Donald Livingston who could be the brother of Margaret Livingstone (the second wife of William Stewart).  There was no definite census entry for Janet or Jessy Stewart.  Also John Conolly, Margaret’s husband was not found nearby or in the whole of Scotland.  He may not have been in the country at that point in time.   Probably the more likely scenario with our ancestor John Stewart is that he was the journeyman Wright in Perth which is not far from Scone.    

The other entries are for daughters  Elizabeth Stewart in Burnside, Cargill and Jean Crichton in Kinclaven.  Margaret Stewart was living with her father William Stewart, shoemaker in Scone.  His grand-daughter Elisabeth (Elizabeth’s daughter) was also with them at the time.   I know nothing about Mary Stewart b. 1813 but it is possible that if she did not marry then she could be a servant at Killichasie house as this estate is connected with Clochfoldich.  These family members of William Stewart were not from the same marriage so his two marriages are now researched.  Matching with ship records in 1841, Janet Stewart, a nurse maid and John Stewart, a carpenter, arrived as singles and both stated they could read and write.   The middle sister, Margaret Stewart, a seamstress, was already married to John Connolly, a wheelwright.  Occupations listed may not be accurate because the new colony required certain skills and census records in 1841 and ship record occupations  often do not match

William’s Marriages in Clochfoldich

His first marriage on 28 February 1808 at Logierait to Elizabeth Erskine of Derculich in the Dull Parish (just slightly to the south of Clochfoldich) . Elizabeth was the mother of his three daughters:  Elizabeth b. 1808, Jean b. 1809 and Mary b. 1813, the same year Elizabeth Erskine died.  William is listed as a shoemaker of Little Clochfoldich on the marriage record.  Verification of Elizabeth Erskine’s  possible birth in Bailntium to Alexander Eskine and Ispol McGregor was found.    This would make her 16 at her marriage if the baptism was a couple of days after the birth but her birth date is not given.  This is possible and she was the only Elizabeth Erskine found in the Perthshire area.  The birth area was not at Derculich though but at Bailtuim,  not far downstream of the Tay.  This would make William about 31 at the marriage.




 
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Unfortunately, even though there was an extensive search done, none of the daughters were found in the Parish records.  I know they exist from ancestral records on ancestry.com and this has now been verified since contact with the  GatheringGardiners blogspot compiled by Kent.   William’s grand-daughter Margaret Stewart married Robert Gardiner in Liverpool harbour on the emigration path to Salt Lake City, Utah.   Margaret is Elizabeth and Robert Stewart’s daughter.   There is an extended history on this site relating to Margaret Gardiner’s family. 

The only parish record regarding this first family is the marriage of Jean Stewart b. 1809 and James Crighton or Crichton. Certainly there was family history mentioning a sister left behind in Scotland named Jean who married James Crichton.    At  John Stewart’s funeral in 1905 there was a Mr Crichton Stewart in attendance which verifies the connection with Jean Stewart.  


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The marriage of  Elizabeth and Robert Stewart could not be found in Perth parish records,  Catholic records, or Blair Atholl records.    It is unknown if Mary Stewart b. 1813 married or not.

Elizabeth Stewart died sometime in 1813 or 1814.  William had re-married by December 1814 to Margaret Livingstone at Redgorton, near Scone.   He obviously did not live at Scone then as the family of Margaret and William were born at Little Clochfoldich.  




 
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It is possible that Margaret Livingstone is the daughter of John Livingstone and Margaret McDonald born at the Brea of Tullipourie on 8th   August, 1779.   This would make her two years younger than William at this second marriage.  

  The only John Livingstone of Logierait marriage I could find in the area was to Margaret McDougall of Fortingall parish in 1768.  This could have been a first marriage for John as well as many childbirth related deaths occurred
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There is a Donald Livingston living at Clochfoldich in 1841 who could possibly be Margaret’s brother but Margaret Livingstone died prior to the 1841 census  so no information can be verified unless that record is found.  In the United Kingdom, births, marriages and deaths were compulsory since 1837 but the Scottish records were not necessarily the same.  A brief look in the official records of Scotland did not reveal any deaths.  It is possible that Margaret and John Connoly’s marriage is in the official records of Scotland not the parish records.

The Stewart Family’s Arrival in Australia

Probably the very best account that could be given of the conditions in a penal colony at the time they arrived is that written by Charles Duncan, the brother of John Stewart’s wife – Jane Duncan.  This article is  pasted at the end of the document. Charles made no mention of the fact that two of his siblings youngest sister Ann, and eldest brother James,  died on the voyage, his baby sister Ann and eldest brother James Duncan.  The Duncan family headed to the Hunter Valley soon after arriving in Sydney.   John Stewart joined them later after earning some money working as a carpenter.   Charles Duncan’s father,  James, was employed as a convict overseer and saw some terrible scenes with convicts being ill-treated.  The push factor for Charles and his brother David  to leave the Hunter Valley was the constant floods.  The pull factor was brother in law  Thomas Gray who was settled in Brisbane and informed them of new allotments at Bald Hills on the outskirts of Brisbane.  Charles Duncan  did not stay long farming at Bald Hills and moved on to other ventures  but  David Blackether Duncan also married to an unrelated Stewart from the Fort William area of Scotland   and John Stewart and Jane Duncan remained in the area.   The area they settled was pin-marked for a settlement to support a proposed large port at the nearby coastal area of Bramble Bay where Sandgate now is located. 

John Stewart and Jane Duncan Stewart – first settlers at Bald Hills, Brisbane

After their experiences on the Hunter River, the settlers selected the higher ground for their farms, erecting their first houses [apparently slab and bark] on the low ridge above the South Pine River where St Peter's Anglican School is now situated.  Fearing attack from Aborigines, their houses were loop-holed for rifles and located within sight of each other.  These precautions proved unnecessary, for at the request of Thomas Gray and other settlers in the area between Cabbage Tree Creek and Caboolture, a detachment of Native Police was stationed at Sandgate from 1858 to 1862.  Under the command of Lieutenant Frederick Wheeler, the Native Police eliminated Aboriginal resistance to white settlement in the Pine Rivers, Cabbage Tree Creek and Caboolture districts by the early 1860s.

The Stewart and Duncan families cleared the gentle slopes along the South Pine River for their crops.  By the end of the 1860s most of the valuable stands of red cedar and hoop pine in the Bald Hills district had been removed, although much scrub remained.  Through the 1860s, 1870s and 1880s maize, potatoes and some oaten and wheaten hay were the principal cash crops, and John Stewart had early experimented with arrowroot and cotton, for which he won bronze and silver medals at the London International Exhibition of 1862.  Following the opening of a railway to Bald Hills in 1888, dairying became the principal economic activity in the district.  By 1929, dairy farmers at Bald Hills were supplying up to 1000 gallons of milk daily to Brisbane and Sandgate. 

John Stewart and his family were well respected in the Bald Hills community and active members of the local Presbyterian church, John serving as an Elder for nearly 40 years.  The earliest Presbyterian services in the Bald Hills district were conducted at the Stewart home until a small slab and shingled church was erected in 1863 at the corner of the Strathpine and Bald Hills roads.  In 1889 the slab church was replaced by a

Little Cloichfoldich


The gamekeepers house at Little Clochfoldich. A gamekeeper (often abbreviated to keeper) is a person who manages an area of countryside to make sure there is enough game for shooting, or fish for angling, and who actively manages areas of woodland, moorland, waterway or farmland for the benefit of game birds, deer, fish and wildlife in general.




 Barn at Little Clochfoldich


Ballechin Stewarts


This is the Catholic Church that I believe was once in ownership of Ballechin Steuarts. It is under private ownership and is being restored. It has Stewart graves dating back to 1700 but we only saw the more recent ones. Our Stewart's said they were Catholics so highly likely that they attended this church when able to as catholism was outlawed after Jacobite revolution for a while. It is the Ballechin Steuarts that have a different lineage to the rest of the Stewarts in that area who are descendants of Robert or Alexander? Stewart a younger son of James the 3rd. Ballechin Stewart's are an illegitimate son of James 2nd. James the 2nd brother is John of Bonkyll and he I think is from the Appin Stewarts. So that is maybe why it has been stated that William Stewart was more an Appin Stewart. In their lines John and William and James appear as names rather than Robert and Alexander in the other branch. Anyway my best guess is that these are the old Atholl roots rather than the later generation roots of probably your other ancestor Robert Stewart. There was also an Isabella Steuart at little Clochfoldich census of old Athol roots and the information in the genealogy I posted on Ballechin mention an Isabella Steuart. Also William or his father James ? married at Blair Atholl as it may have been where his ancestors married. Our family have this spelling of Steuart in the old records. This is when others have Stewart written down so it is not just a spelling mistake. Anyway it is an explanation. I think I read Appin Stewart's are related to the current royal family through their descendants but I did not keep the article. You of course have both lines. Also we had that odd connection with Mark being able to relate to them as well through marriage. I think this is because later one of the Ballechin Steuarts was in East India company and so were his ancestors we think and maybe in India there was some marriage connecting the two lines. Our family more say they were from Strathtay but we didn't go there. We went to Logierait. Ballechin estate may have once included Clochfoldich. You would have to look at an old map.
  

2015 Visit to Cloichfolich, Perthshire, Scotland





















































































































































 


















2015

Plot At Cloichfoldich

Strathtay, Pitlochry, Perth and Kinross, PH9 0LP
OIRO
£90,000
Detailed planning consent for a single dwelling house.
Outstanding views across the surrounding countryside.
0.6 acre site.
LOCATION
The subjects are located in a beautiful rural location just a short distance to the west of the conservation village of Strathtay in the heart of Highland Perthshire. This area of Scotland is renowned for its magnificent scenery and accessibility to outdoor pursuits. Strathtay together with its sister village Grandtully boasts a well-stocked village shop and Post Office, an 9 hole golf course, a primary school, a village pub and restaurant, a coffee house/gift shop/chocolatier, a bowling club and two churches.

The plot is readily accessible in this Highland Perthshire location. The nearby towns of Aberfeldy and Pitlochry approximately 6.5 miles and 14.6 miles respectively offer an excellent range of schools, shops and services with Aberfeldy home to the re-opened state of the art Birks Cinema. Pitlochry railway station is on the main Inverness/London line with sleeper services whilst the town boast its famous Theatre in the Hills. The A9 is within a 15 minute drive making Perth, Edinburgh and Glasgow easily accessible.

DESCRIPTION
The subjects comprise of a single house plot extending to approximately 0.6 acres (0.24 hectares) which occupies an elevated position benefiting from excellent views across the surrounding countryside to the south and west. The subjects slope from north to south and are bounded to the north partly by a post and rylock fence and partly unfenced, to the south and east by a post and rylock fence and unfenced to the west. The subjects benefit from detailed planning consent for a single dwelling house. The proposed dwelling comprises the following accommodation:
Kitchen. Dining Room. Utility. Master bedroom with en-suite. 3 Double Bedroom. Billiard Room. Double Garage.
- See more at: http://www.ckdgalbraith.co.uk/property/per150028-plot-cloichfoldich-strathtay-pitlochry-perth-and-kinross-ph9-0lp#sthash.bXTJvTGm.dpuf

Plot At Cloichfoldich

Strathtay, Pitlochry, Perth and Kinross, PH9 0LP
OIRO
£90,000
Detailed planning consent for a single dwelling house.
Outstanding views across the surrounding countryside.
0.6 acre site.
LOCATION
The subjects are located in a beautiful rural location just a short distance to the west of the conservation village of Strathtay in the heart of Highland Perthshire. This area of Scotland is renowned for its magnificent scenery and accessibility to outdoor pursuits. Strathtay together with its sister village Grandtully boasts a well-stocked village shop and Post Office, an 9 hole golf course, a primary school, a village pub and restaurant, a coffee house/gift shop/chocolatier, a bowling club and two churches.

The plot is readily accessible in this Highland Perthshire location. The nearby towns of Aberfeldy and Pitlochry approximately 6.5 miles and 14.6 miles respectively offer an excellent range of schools, shops and services with Aberfeldy home to the re-opened state of the art Birks Cinema. Pitlochry railway station is on the main Inverness/London line with sleeper services whilst the town boast its famous Theatre in the Hills. The A9 is within a 15 minute drive making Perth, Edinburgh and Glasgow easily accessible.

DESCRIPTION
The subjects comprise of a single house plot extending to approximately 0.6 acres (0.24 hectares) which occupies an elevated position benefiting from excellent views across the surrounding countryside to the south and west. The subjects slope from north to south and are bounded to the north partly by a post and rylock fence and partly unfenced, to the south and east by a post and rylock fence and unfenced to the west. The subjects benefit from detailed planning consent for a single dwelling house. The proposed dwelling comprises the following accommodation:
Kitchen. Dining Room. Utility. Master bedroom with en-suite. 3 Double Bedroom. Billiard Room. Double Garage.
- See more at: http://www.ckdgalbraith.co.uk/property/per150028-plot-cloichfoldich-strathtay-pitlochry-perth-and-kinross-ph9-0lp#sthash.bXTJvTGm.dpuf

Plot At Cloichfoldich

Strathtay, Pitlochry, Perth and Kinross, PH9 0LP
OIRO
£90,000
Detailed planning consent for a single dwelling house.
Outstanding views across the surrounding countryside.
0.6 acre site.
LOCATION
The subjects are located in a beautiful rural location just a short distance to the west of the conservation village of Strathtay in the heart of Highland Perthshire. This area of Scotland is renowned for its magnificent scenery and accessibility to outdoor pursuits. Strathtay together with its sister village Grandtully boasts a well-stocked village shop and Post Office, an 9 hole golf course, a primary school, a village pub and restaurant, a coffee house/gift shop/chocolatier, a bowling club and two churches.

The plot is readily accessible in this Highland Perthshire location. The nearby towns of Aberfeldy and Pitlochry approximately 6.5 miles and 14.6 miles respectively offer an excellent range of schools, shops and services with Aberfeldy home to the re-opened state of the art Birks Cinema. Pitlochry railway station is on the main Inverness/London line with sleeper services whilst the town boast its famous Theatre in the Hills. The A9 is within a 15 minute drive making Perth, Edinburgh and Glasgow easily accessible.

DESCRIPTION
The subjects comprise of a single house plot extending to approximately 0.6 acres (0.24 hectares) which occupies an elevated position benefiting from excellent views across the surrounding countryside to the south and west. The subjects slope from north to south and are bounded to the north partly by a post and rylock fence and partly unfenced, to the south and east by a post and rylock fence and unfenced to the west. The subjects benefit from detailed planning consent for a single dwelling house. The proposed dwelling comprises the following accommodation:
Kitchen. Dining Room. Utility. Master bedroom with en-suite. 3 Double Bedroom. Billiard Room. Double Garage.
- See more at: http://www.ckdgalbraith.co.uk/property/per150028-plot-cloichfoldich-strathtay-pitlochry-perth-and-kinross-ph9-0lp#sthash.bXTJvTGm.dpuf

Plot At Cloichfoldich

Strathtay, Pitlochry, Perth and Kinross, PH9 0LP
OIRO
£90,000
Detailed planning consent for a single dwelling house.
Outstanding views across the surrounding countryside.
0.6 acre site.
LOCATION
The subjects are located in a beautiful rural location just a short distance to the west of the conservation village of Strathtay in the heart of Highland Perthshire. This area of Scotland is renowned for its magnificent scenery and accessibility to outdoor pursuits. Strathtay together with its sister village Grandtully boasts a well-stocked village shop and Post Office, an 9 hole golf course, a primary school, a village pub and restaurant, a coffee house/gift shop/chocolatier, a bowling club and two churches.

The plot is readily accessible in this Highland Perthshire location. The nearby towns of Aberfeldy and Pitlochry approximately 6.5 miles and 14.6 miles respectively offer an excellent range of schools, shops and services with Aberfeldy home to the re-opened state of the art Birks Cinema. Pitlochry railway station is on the main Inverness/London line with sleeper services whilst the town boast its famous Theatre in the Hills. The A9 is within a 15 minute drive making Perth, Edinburgh and Glasgow easily accessible.

DESCRIPTION
The subjects comprise of a single house plot extending to approximately 0.6 acres (0.24 hectares) which occupies an elevated position benefiting from excellent views across the surrounding countryside to the south and west. The subjects slope from north to south and are bounded to the north partly by a post and rylock fence and partly unfenced, to the south and east by a post and rylock fence and unfenced to the west. The subjects benefit from detailed planning consent for a single dwelling house. The proposed dwelling comprises the following accommodation:
Kitchen. Dining Room. Utility. Master bedroom with en-suite. 3 Double Bedroom. Billiard Room. Double Garage.





2015

Pictured: Some nice looking water, running off the main croy in Cloichfoldich Pool.
Fishing on the Tay at cloichfoldich info.
So a beat is a stretch of the river where the fishing rights are owned by the landowner of the land that the river runs adjacent to. This means that generally the longer the river the more differently owned land it will pass through and the more beats it will probably have. The shorter the river the less beats.
 
The riparian owner determines the number of people allowed to fish on their beat per day and this usually depends on the length of the beat. A typical 2 mile beat would normally issue a maximum of between 6 or 8 permits per day and therefore there would be a maximum of between 6 to 8 anglers only fishing on a 2 mile strech of water. There is no national rod licence required to fish in Scotland as there is in England so the only permit required is the permit issued by the beat.

Most beat owners provide a number of services and facilities for their stretch of the river including a fishing bothy with a kettle, microwave oven, dining area and toilets (these do not have bedrooms and are not used for providing accommodation). On a number of beats boats and a boatman are available and the beat owners also maintain the river banks ensuring safe and easy access to the river.